Bilingual Person

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Bilingual Person

A person with the ability to speak two languages. In areas where two languages are common, bilingual persons are often paid more to do the same jobs as monolingual persons because they are able to service more customers with less difficulty.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to completing the demographic and PMBM questionnaires, participants watched a video displaying a conversation among three bilingual persons who switched codes.
In the video you will watch three bilingual persons talking.
It was translated in Urdu by 5 bilingual persons having Advanced Diploma in Clinical Psychology.
The instrument was administered to two bilingual persons to determine whether the instrument was appropriately translated into the Korean language.
Two different bilingual persons who did not see the original version of the translated instrument were asked to do a back translation.
For instance, the assessment of fully bilingual and partly bilingual persons may indicate different decisions about what language to use and how to interpret results.
To further complicate matters, each language, with its associated culture and value system, may place unique constraints on the bilingual person's sense of identity (Northover, 1988).
While it did implicitly recognize the connection between language and national origin, which is a position significantly more consistent with linguistic studies than the findings of other courts have been,(20) the Sandoval court's passive acceptance of the Ninth and Fifth Circuits' decisions suggests that bilingual persons will continue to have uncertain claims for relief under the civil rights laws.
The significance of this trend is that it treats unlike cases alike, unjustly lumping fully bilingual persons with those who have only basic communication skills in secondary languages.
Chapter 13 provides an excellent, short overview about how, for bilingual individuals, a test in English can become an English test (though these fail to acknowledge the corollary: For bilingual persons, a test in Spanish can become a Spanish test).
Standards 13.4 (translations), 13.5 (employment), 13.6 (comparability of test versions), and 13.7 (multimeasures for language proficiency testing) are quite good and constitute the best directives on testing bilingual persons. None of these, however, addresses two critical areas: the use of interpreters and the linguistic competencies of the school psychologists.
Phase I was the translation of the instrument, phase II was the pilot testing with bilingual persons, and phase III was the measurement of psychometric properties.
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