Bilingual Person

(redirected from Bilingual Individual)

Bilingual Person

A person with the ability to speak two languages. In areas where two languages are common, bilingual persons are often paid more to do the same jobs as monolingual persons because they are able to service more customers with less difficulty.
References in periodicals archive ?
The nature of semantic organization in the two languages of a bilingual individual affects influences their performance on verbal fluency tasks.
A bilingual individual uses both languages actively, even when only one language is being used in a monolingual context (Bialystok, 2007, 2010).
The most widely used technique in these guidelines is the model proposed by Brislin (1970, 1980), which consists of a series of translations and back-translations of the original instrument by bilingual individuals. This technique involves four steps: (1) forward-translation of the English instrument into the target language by a bilingual individual, (2) back-translation of the translated instrument into English by another bilingual individual, (3) comparative review of the original English and back-translated English versions of the instrument for any inconsistencies, and (4) revision of the translated instrument through collaborative work by the bilingual translators (and possibly additional bilingual individuals).
This effort to form values in Quechua illustrates the cerebral processes of a bilingual individual. For example, Ernesto prepares the thought in Spanish with the words, "Acaso no podria decirse," but he finishes it with the Quechua terms, "yawar rumi." From one conceptual base, the young protagonist must manage the conflict inherent between his two language processing systems in order to construct ideas about the world in which he lives, how he relates to it and who he is.
In fact, a bilingual individual versed in English may be at a disadvantage when compared to entering a non-enclave market.
Well, let us know we had been horribly mistaken, as there are phenomena that happen in the mind of the bilingual individual. These phenomena, although somewhat apologetic about forgetting words in a certain language or recurring to another one, are real, relevant and unavoidable.
They go from definitions like Grosjean's (1985), totally referred to contexts in which bilingualism occurs in a society, and Hornberger's (2003), more easily adaptable to a diversity of contexts: According to Grosjean a bilingual individual uses two languages regularly in his or her daily life.
Real time conversations in family contexts were audio-taped (50 minutes after editing) in order to observe the association between communicative context and language choice in a bilingual individual, i.e., in what way the conversational partner and the linguistic input influence linguistic preference.
In stage 1 I selected one prelingually deaf bilingual individual who translated the scale items into ASL.
It posits that reading performance is particularly hampered when the bilingual individual has deficits in both languages.
The challenge in exploring these issues lies with selecting an appropriate level of analysis, given that clients, counselors, and supervisors can be bilingual or multilingual and that either the bilingual individual's mother tongue or English, or both, can be his or her dominant or preferred language.
What are the ethical dilemmas when a monolingual English speaker hires a bilingual individual to conduct interviews in a language other than English?
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