Big Business

(redirected from Big Businesses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Big Business

A somewhat pejorative term for large corporations. The term especially connotes corporations that have a great deal of political power. The term originated in the middle and late 19th century, when a large number of mergers and acquisitions consolidated many large companies that previously existed. Opponents of big business on both ends of the political spectrum contend that large corporations have too much power in government and use their influence to extract favorable legislation.
References in periodicals archive ?
While I welcome this code as a positive first step, I will be keeping a close eye on how the code is adopted, its take up rate, how it works in practice and the encouragement it provides to big businesses throughout Australia.
Which means the Department of Energy (DOE) needed to find the balance from other players and big businesses, he said.
If we want to see England do better, we need to get away from this national obsession with "Big Business Knows Best." There can't be a better example of the way that big businesses look after themselves, and not the interests of the country as a whole.
The result, De Rugy concludes, is that small businesses aren't being subsidized to compete with big businesses so much as with other small businesses.
How are Wal-Mart, Toyota and other big businesses creating even more value in their already-large companies?
No doubt the same big businesses that supply the weapons used to fight the same wars.
The idea is for big businesses to assist small business owners who stand to benefit from the higher level of competence and experience of their larger counterparts.
Export-Import Bank model, and so do big businesses.
In part 1, the author defines the term "big business" and reveals the criteria he employed to ascertain Europe's big businesses. The two yardsticks utilized were the number of employees and the amount of paid-up capital.
History: Several highly visible business writers came up with this buzzword right after World War II and shopped it to big businesses. Those folks were feeling very cocky at the time, however, and ignored it.
IBM Corp is spending $100m to carry the momentum of its e- business campaign down to small businesses and overturn the notion that IBM is a big business just for big businesses. The money will be spent on a marketing campaign to highlight a swathe of products and services focused around the web which IBM will sell to support e-commerce solutions at businesses with 100 employees or less.
But big businesses, like McDonald's and other fast food franchisers, were apoplectic: They want unions to have to organize the largest possible unit, which makes the job more difficult.