Big Bang

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Big Bang

The term applied to the liberalization in 1986 of the London Stock Exchange (LSE) when trading was automated.

Big Bang

An informal term referring to the deregulation of the London Stock Market on October 27, 1986. On that date, a number of changes occurred, including a shift from an open outcry system to an electronic exchange. Perhaps most important, however, was the abolition of fixed commissions, which completely changed the way brokers on the London Stock Market conducted their business. Big Bang significantly increased the volume on the London Stock Exchange and reversed its trend of falling behind other world stock markets. It was a major part of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's financial reform program.

It is important to note that one does not refer to Big Bang as the Big Bang.

Big Bang

The date, October 27, 1986, on which the London security markets were significantly deregulated. The deregulation eliminated fixed commissions on security trades and put an end to the prohibition against securities firms acting as brokers and dealers.

big bang

see STOCK EXCHANGE.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noted here that the big bang model suggests that the spacetime of the universe is flat (i.e.
In "Our Quest of the Cosmos," Chris Impey of the University of Arizona outlines evidences for the big bang model, examines various possibilities for the shape of space, and considers the existence of mysterious "dark matter." Next, Ian McLean of UCLA, in his article "The Astronomers' New Tools," introduces key technologies underlying the powerful new telescopes that promise to revolutionize astronomy.
This problem for the original Big Bang model that arises from its yielding the constraint (the present value of [ohm]) only for an initial value of [ohm] close to 1 is not that the model thereby loses some flexibility in accommodating future data.
This origin of the universe is somewhat similar to the big bang model, in which the universe exploded from a singular point at the beginning, but the physics is quite different.
The big bang model implies that the physical universe (all that there is) may be much larger than the observable universe (all we can see).
Franco Selleri of the Universita di Bari in Italy provided an equally interesting alternative--the certainty that the Universe in which we live and breathe is a construction in simple 3-D Euclidean space precludes the possibility of the Big Bang model. He says: "No structure in three dimensional space, born from an explosion that occurred 10 to 20 billion years ago, could resemble the Universe we observe".
It is remarkable that Smith has so high a degree of confidence in quantum fluctuation models that he thinks it unreasonable to believe in (TH), for this is tantamout to saying that in light of these theories it is no longer reasonable to hold to a Big Bang model involving a singularity.
This era started 100 years ago with the publication of Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity and came to its height in the 1920s when the theory of relativity was used to develop the big bang model. However, at this moment there is a crisis within cosmology.
Szalay, "and so far, they are." This concordance means that astronomers can use the data to constrain aspects of the Big Bang model such as the rate of the universe's expansion and the amount of matter, both dark and light, contained in the universe.
Moreover, the Big Bang model would tend to produce a cosmos whose composition and density would vary widely from place to place and whose overall geometry would be warped or curved.
Moreover, there's Edgar Allan Poe's musings that vaguely foreshadowed the Big Bang model and an informed and highly literate toast to Albert Einstein by George Bernard Shaw.
The Big Bang model has been phenomenally successful in explaining the events that took place beginning one-hundredth of a second after the birth of the universe.