Bidding War

(redirected from Bidding Wars)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Bidding War

A situation in which two persons or organization are so interested in a product, asset, or potential employee that they offer successively higher prices or salaries for it. For example, two potential employers for a recent graduate may be so interested that when the first offers $50,000, the other comes back with $55,000, which leads the first to increase to $60,000, and so forth. Bidding wars usually occur very rapidly.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he condemned it for joining bidding wars for shows and said it should not try to be ITV.
In some cases, bidding wars are becoming prevalent again, and in other cases a listing will sit stale for months," LeFauve said.
A once obscure data storage firm, 3PAR is now at the center of a $2 billion bidding war between powerhouses Hewlett-Packard Co (HPQ.
While taking that risk early on hasn't lead to bidding wars, it has yielded steady sales momentum.
Halo" looks unlikely to enter the ethos of legendary Hollywood bidding wars fox" one simple reason: Microsoft's request for $10 million against 15% of the gross and a January start date isn't doable with a script many studio execs say is simply not up to snuff.
The Parry Sound area isn't wading into the deep waters of any bidding wars to lure major manufacturers to town.
With unemployment near its lowest level in three decades, tech companies, banks, and consulting firms are in bidding wars for graduates.
As the federal government steps back, states fight increasingly damaging bidding wars with each other.
Bidding wars characterized some 36% of the cash tender offers through June in which acquisitions were contested by other potential buyers.
Known for frustrating bidding wars and sometimes low-quality secondhand merchandise, the public knew they deserved better than the online auctions that were out there.
As The Real Deal and other publications have reported, bidding wars -- once thought to be bygone relics of the real estate boom -- started reappearing in New York late last year.
Miller also claimed that lower prices have enticed buyers to more readily engage again in bidding wars that in turn can sometimes drive apartment prices nearly back to where they had been before they took a dip in recent months.