Beveridge Report


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

Beveridge Report

A report to the British Cabinet recommending the creation of the modern Welfare State. The Beveridge Report cited five social evils in the United Kingdom: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. It recommended an expansion of the National Insurance program and the creation of what became the National Health Service. It was published in 1941 and most of its recommendations were adopted following the Labour Party victory in the 1945 election.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
She writes: "We need a new Beveridge report for the 21st Century, defining a new social contract with the British people, addressing the poverty, inequalities and indignity millions of people, young and old, are enduring; bringing hope to a new generation as it did 70 years ago."
Todays approach to welfare has to be significantly different from the response of the Attlee government to the Beveridge report.
was the New Zealand plan." (35) A few months later, when there had been time to absorb the British proposals more fully, The Ellesmere Guardian remarked that the "now famous Beveridge report on social security is regarded by officials of the International Labour Office ...
Para los propositos de este articulo se estudiaron los siguientes escritos: Social Insurance and Allied Services, 1942 (Beveridge Report); "Social Security: Some Trans-Atlantic Comparisons", publicado en Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, 1943; "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness (1950 Model)", publicado en The Review of Economics and Statistics, 1946, y La ocupacion plena, impreso por el Fondo de Cultura Economica en Mexico en 1947.
14 In politics, in which decade was the Beveridge Report, which led to the establishment of the Welfare State, released: the 1940s, 1950s or 1960s?
The conclusion underlines this point, connecting the 1942 Beveridge Report, which provided the framework for Britain's postwar welfare state, with its wartime context--essentially arguing the welfare state as the logical companion of the emerging "civil defense" state (318).
Since the Beveridge report was implemented, it has gone frosupplying basic benefits to people to help them in times of need to supplying them payments for every conceivable perceived need that crops up.
R BUTCHER should spend some time reading the Beveridge Report.
It's (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/december/1/newsid_4696000/4696207.stm) 70 years since the publication of the Beveridge Report , a landmark document that is credited with the birth of Britain's welfare state.
The British are not turning their backs on the welfare state, Kellner believes, but want "to return to its essence," as conceived in the famous Beveridge Report of 1942.
As a result of the Beveridge Report of 1943, plans for the future of post-war Britain identified the main issues facing British society, including disease, and laid the foundations of the welfare state.
Furthermore, the Beveridge Report of 1942 was written by a Liberal MP.