Beveridge Report


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Beveridge Report

A report to the British Cabinet recommending the creation of the modern Welfare State. The Beveridge Report cited five social evils in the United Kingdom: squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease. It recommended an expansion of the National Insurance program and the creation of what became the National Health Service. It was published in 1941 and most of its recommendations were adopted following the Labour Party victory in the 1945 election.
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Todays approach to welfare has to be significantly different from the response of the Attlee government to the Beveridge report.
35) A few months later, when there had been time to absorb the British proposals more fully, The Ellesmere Guardian remarked that the "now famous Beveridge report on social security is regarded by officials of the International Labour Office .
En el contexto de la reconstruccion, el Beveridge Report tenia por deber "llevar a cabo, con especial referencia a la interrelacion de esquemas, un estudio sobre los existentes sistemas nacionales de seguridad social y servicios aliados, incluidas las compensaciones al trabajador, y hacer recomendaciones" (22).
R BUTCHER should spend some time reading the Beveridge Report.
stm) 70 years since the publication of the Beveridge Report , a landmark document that is credited with the birth of Britain's welfare state.
The British are not turning their backs on the welfare state, Kellner believes, but want "to return to its essence," as conceived in the famous Beveridge Report of 1942.
As a result of the Beveridge Report of 1943, plans for the future of post-war Britain identified the main issues facing British society, including disease, and laid the foundations of the welfare state.
Furthermore, the Beveridge Report of 1942 was written by a Liberal MP.
Sixty years on from the Beveridge report and the creation of the welfare state, his five giants of squalor, disease, ignorance, want and idleness have been cut down to size, though they still stalk the land.
O'Brien reflects the new Fabian socialism emerging in the 1940s, led by William Beveridge, who laid the foundation for Britain's National Social Insurance and National Health Service with The Report on Social Insurance, commonly known as the Beveridge Report.
And certainly the government is keen to overhaul the current system, with Purnell's proposals described as the greatest revolution since the Beveridge Report of 1942 - which founded the modern welfare state.
Following the publication of the Beveridge report in the United Kingdom in December 1942 the Irish government began to look at the feasibility of applying a similar scheme to Ireland.