Benefit Cost Ratio

(redirected from Benefit-Cost Ratios)

Benefit Cost Ratio

A ratio representing the benefits of a project or investment compared to its cost. The BCR may be a strictly financial ratio, comparing the expected return to the cost of investment, or it may account for approximations of qualitative measurements.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
These data revealed which agencies saw their benefit-cost ratios change over the course of the rulemaking, as well as the aggregate change in net benefits during the life of the rulemaking.
The report also discusses a benefit-cost tool with standardized methodology that can be employed universally and equitably in estimating benefit-cost ratios for different TIM programs.
Further, bringing ambitious actions to cut emissions forward by 10 years is found to increase benefit-cost ratios by more than 30% and lower long-run costs by more than a quarter.
The 'costs' which we use to estimate such benefit-cost ratios are prevention costs related to each disease.
If yields increase little, as more pessimistic studies suggest, benefits of the programme are small and do not exceed the costs of the subsidies resulting in benefit-cost ratios below one.
However, minimum economic returns and benefit-cost ratios were recorded from sole synthetic canola and its intercrops.
Comparing with estimated benefits of $9,049 and $16,257, benefit-cost ratios were about 11:1 and 6:1 (6:1 and 2:1 using the unweighted costs).
Critics believe the Department for Transport's insistence on a framework which utilises benefit-cost ratios led to the 12 bypasses or other road schemes winning out over bus and rail.
Benefit-cost ratios were greatly affected by relative cost, generally favoring selection criteria with lower cost and reduced expected gain (Fig.
Benefit-cost ratios, in which the benefits are expressed as a percentage of the program costs.
Specifically, benefit-cost ratios are calculated which compare avoided flood damage resulting from hypothetical wetland restoration alternatives to wetland restoration costs over a future 20-year period.