Benefit Cost Ratio


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Benefit Cost Ratio

A ratio representing the benefits of a project or investment compared to its cost. The BCR may be a strictly financial ratio, comparing the expected return to the cost of investment, or it may account for approximations of qualitative measurements.
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The benefit cost ratio (BCR) has in fact improved due to the inclusion of additional factors such as the European Train Control system (ETCS), the introduction of Fairer Fares and updated demographics.
In 2011 the estimated benefit cost ratio (BCR) to Bristol and Swansea were both above HM Treasury's base acceptance rate of 2% and when Valley Lines was included reached over 4%.
The Benefit Cost Ratio is also higher for organic crops which suggest that farmers can get higher profits by moving from conventional to organic crops.
Furthermore, turbo seeder in standing rice stubbles at 45 cm height significantly produced 32-35% more benefit cost ratio than zone disk tiller at 15 cm stubble height during both years of experiment.
The computed values of cost of energy (COE), payback period, net present value (NPV) and benefit cost ratio (BCR) are based on previously listed assumptions Table 4.
Poor farmers cannot afford mineral fertilizers due to high rate so; higher benefit cost ratio was also observed.
Economic evaluation in terms of investment cost analysis (ICA), net profit value (NPV), gross profit (GP), profit Index (PI) and benefit cost ratio (BCR) of substituting fishmeal with the non-conventional animal feedstuff's in the culture of Heterobranchus longifilis was determined according to New [13] (Table 3).
The results showed that benefit cost ratio increased by increasing application of nutrients to soil.
For instance, the Benefit Cost Ratio to rail users in the east is 5.
Comparing the economics of the treatments it was observed that treatment with two rows sugarcane sole strip gave benefit cost ratio of 2.
The Australian Transport Council (ATC) have identified that the benefit cost ratio (BCR), the net present value (NPV), and first-year rate of return (FYRR) decision criteria are appropriate inputs to project prioritization, mutual exclusive project selection, and optimal timing, respectively.
Campaigners insist the HS2 business case has fallen apart in recent weeks after: * The government's crucial benefit cost ratio (BCR) was revised down for a fourth time.