BEN

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BEN

GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for Benin. The code is used for transactions to and from Beninese bank accounts and for international shipping to Benin. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.
References in periodicals archive ?
In sum, Benes has done a great service to the field by chronicling hundreds of itinerants on the early Anglo-American mainland, though readers will likely miss a clearer interpretation of how to consider those itinerants' work as a whole, and how it affected American society and culture.
Benes: Yes, I generally agree with the economist Paul Krugman when he said that Japan's economy has been crippled by caution for the last two decades.
In addition to Benes the other award winners include:
Closed formulas of these indices for two important classes of interconnection networks named as butterfly and Benes networks.
"We believe that our system aids both novices and experts in resolving issues prior to costly printing (both in time and money)," Benes and his colleagues wrote in their paper.
Among the moderates were a number of groups dedicated to the reunification of Cuban families, as well as prominent Cuban-American Bernardo Benes (who had been active in Carter's 1976 Presidential campaign).
Because the problem had to do with the services that the celebrity didn't feel were rendered correctly, it was Benes' job to iron it out.
"It's obvious you need some smaller boat to be able to patrol that area," Benes said.
With 25 years of experience in the agriculture industry, Vernon Benes has a deep understanding of effective sales and marketing strategies in the crop protection channel.
The divergent political aims of the SNC, the Benes exile government, and the Soviet Union prevented them from ever being able to establish a single coordinated plan and thereby employ their forces and resources in concert to greater effect.
All ready overwait, she eight stake, bred, benes, bury pi.
Inversely, an essay on the controversial Benes Decrees (which among other things laid the groundwork for the expulsion of Germans from post-war Czechoslovakia) takes a personal turn when Demetz describes the work of the exile journal Skutecnost, for which he worked in the early 1950s and which engaged in perilous questioning about the Aussiedlung long before the better known debates of the late 1960s.