Barometer Stock

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Barometer Stock

A stock in a well-known or highly-regarded company in a given sector. The performance of a barometer stock is considered to be an indicator of the performance of its particular sector or industry. The term "barometer stock" is chiefly British; in the U.S., the primary term is bellwether stock.
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One of the bellwether stocks for the overall chip sector is Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (NYSE:(https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/TSM?p=TSM) TSM ), the leading pure-play foundry.
Bellwether stocks such as Emaar Properties and Dubai Islamic Bank (DIB) led the fall, with losses of as much as 3 per cent, Emaar Properties closed 2.8 per cent lower at Dh5.13.
While bellwether stocks like Bank of Cyprus, have been struggling the CSE has difficulty in drawing in companies which will add value to the market and reverse its poor image.
"Within oilfield services it's best to hold the bellwether stocks as they will be taking market share," Menges said.
The 18 bellwether stocks each represent 2.22% of the portfolio and about 40% collectively, while the 60 non-bellwether stocks each make up 1.02% of the portfolio, or about 60% of the portfolio in total.
"The big cell phone companies are the bellwether stocks in any market, they're so well correlated to the overall GDP story - that's why international investors get into these markets," said Bull, who invested about 10-20 percent of his fund's money in the Asiacell offering.
It likes companies with high and sustainable dividends, while mega caps - typically household names and bellwether stocks in their respective industries - are best able to withstand periods of economic weakness but do not tend to grow as fast as smaller companies in good times.
Bellwether stocks such as Emaar Properties dropped 5.92 percent.
The disappointing economic figures were at odds with earnings from Pfizer and other bellwether stocks, which are largely surprising on the upside.
No long ago, a senior executive from one of corporate America's large bellwether stocks received a telephone call from law enforcement, explaining that the company had a major software vulnerability in its corporate web site.
The factors underpinning the markets since 2000 are improving business conditions; firmer oil prices leading to renewed investments in the hydrocarbons industry; a positive spill-over into non-oil sectors; investor confidence in Nigeria's nascent democracy; increasing market liquidity, and some excellent corporate results being reported by bellwether stocks, such as Nigerian Breweries, Nestle Nigeria, Guinness Nigeria and Unilever Nigeria.
Bellwether stocks such as brewing and beverages giant Bavaria, the largest cement maker Argos and banks BanColombia and Banco de Bogota are still seen by many analysts as the only relatively good buys.