gross income

(redirected from Before-Tax Incomes)
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Gross income

A person's total income prior to exclusions and deductions.

Gross Income

An individual or company's income before taxes and deductions. For individual income, it is calculated as the individual's wages or salary, investment and asset appreciation, and the amount made from any other source of income. In a company, it is calculated as revenues minus expenses. An individual's gross income is important to determining eligibility for certain social programs, while a company's gross income is one measure among many of how well it uses its resources to produce a profit. See also: Adjusted gross income.

gross income

1. For a business, its total revenues exclusive of any expenses.
2. For an individual, all income except as specifically exempted by the Internal Revenue Code. For example, an inheritance is specifically excluded from gross income.

gross income

The total revenue of a business or individual before deduction for expenses, allowances,depreciation,or other adjustments.

Gross Income

Total worldwide income received in the form of money, property, or services that is subject to tax unless specifically exempt or excluded by law.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to market income, they include all public cash assistance and in-kind benefits from social insurance and government assistance programs to arrive at "before-tax income." Their next step is to subtract all federal taxes including personal income taxes, Social Security payments, excise taxes and corporate income taxes.
(5.) They actually order incomes separately on the basis of market income and before-tax income. Their preferred method is before-tax income and there are three separate sub-populations (elderly without children, households with children, and non-elderly without children).
Workers have lower before-tax incomes prior to payment of their Social Security taxes.
But workers not only pay taxes to finance Social Security retirement benefits, but also have lower before-tax incomes because of the effects on private saving and labor supply.
The, income variable represents before-tax income for 1990.
Meanwhile, families in America's poorest fifth-ones that watched their before-tax incomes fall by 5.5 percent in the eighties and their after-tax incomes by 7 percent-would pull in a whopping $73.
The tax deferral advantage of saving in a 401(k) plan, usually supplemented by employer add-on contributions, encourages households to divert a larger share of before-tax income into these plans than they otherwise would.