gross income

(redirected from Before-Tax Income)
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Gross income

A person's total income prior to exclusions and deductions.

Gross Income

An individual or company's income before taxes and deductions. For individual income, it is calculated as the individual's wages or salary, investment and asset appreciation, and the amount made from any other source of income. In a company, it is calculated as revenues minus expenses. An individual's gross income is important to determining eligibility for certain social programs, while a company's gross income is one measure among many of how well it uses its resources to produce a profit. See also: Adjusted gross income.

gross income

1. For a business, its total revenues exclusive of any expenses.
2. For an individual, all income except as specifically exempted by the Internal Revenue Code. For example, an inheritance is specifically excluded from gross income.

gross income

The total revenue of a business or individual before deduction for expenses, allowances,depreciation,or other adjustments.

Gross Income

Total worldwide income received in the form of money, property, or services that is subject to tax unless specifically exempt or excluded by law.
References in periodicals archive ?
(5.) They actually order incomes separately on the basis of market income and before-tax income. Their preferred method is before-tax income and there are three separate sub-populations (elderly without children, households with children, and non-elderly without children).
Figure 1 displays the 2003-2011 values of before-tax income at the 10th percentile, median, mean, and 90th percentile for the CE's imputed income variable and our imputed income variable.
individual income tax is a progressive tax system, after-tax incomes tend to be more equally distributed than before-tax income. (52) Changes in tax policy would change the distribution of after-tax income.
CBO [2009] reports that households in the top 5 percent of the income distribution earned 32 percent of the nation's before-tax income in 2006.
It also would increase GDP by nearly 10 percent and ultimately raise the before-tax income of average Americans by 10 percent.
Even if each household's before-tax income is similar, the set of effective tax rates each faces can be dramatically different.
The inefficiency inherent in the cash-flow approach as applied to debt-financed investments assumes that the before-tax income yield is fully taxed.
The difference is even more significant because community banks' ROEs reflect after-tax income, while credit unions' ROEs reflect before-tax income. Comparison of performance ratios (ROAs and ROEs) of credit unions with community banks indicates considerable difference in operational efficiency of these two types of depository institutions.
So, as an example, a family of four living in a large Canadian city with a before-tax income of less than $37,253 in 2003 would have been living below the poverty line.
At a 33 percent tax rate, it took $4,500 of before-tax income to produce the $3,000 in the Roth IRA, but only $3,000 to produce a deductible $3,000 in the traditional IRA.
after-tax income status, that is, before-tax income minus federal and state/local taxes