bear market

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Bear market

Any market in which prices exhibit a declining trend. For a prolonged period, usually falling by 20% or more.

Bear Market

A situation in which a large number of indices lose a significant percentage of their value over the medium or long term. While there is no hard-and-fast definition of a bear market, many analysts consider a 20% loss in the Dow Jones Industrial Average or the S&P 500 to be a good rule of thumb. It is difficult to make a positive return on stocks during a bear market, and some investors move into bonds. This leads to the sale of more stocks, and the bear market can become self-sustaining. Technical analysts attempt to find the bottom of bear markets and identify buy signals, but this is risky. A bear market is different from a recession, but one can lead to the other. See also: Bull market.

bear market

An extended period of general price declines in an individual security or other asset, such as silver or real estate; a group of securities; or the securities market as a whole. Nevertheless, even during widespread bear markets, it is possible to have bull markets in particular stocks or groups of stocks. For example, stocks of gold-related companies often move against major trends in the security markets. Compare bull market.

Bear market.

A bear market is sometimes described as a period of falling securities prices and sometimes, more specifically, as a market where prices have fallen 20% or more from the most recent high.

A bear market in stocks is triggered when investors sell off shares, generally because they anticipate worsening economic conditions and falling corporate profits.

A bear market in bonds is usually the result of rising interest rates, which prompts investors to sell off older bonds paying lower rates.

bear market

a situation in which the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) tend to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATION. Compare BULL MARKET.

bear market

a situation where the prices of FINANCIAL SECURITIES (stocks, shares, etc.) or COMMODITIES (tin, wheat, etc.) are tending to fall as a result of persistent selling and only limited buying. See SPECULATOR. Compare BULL MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the United States market, we found that gold returns manifest a low and positive correlation with stock and bond returns, in general and during each of the subperiods, with no significant difference between bullish and bearish markets.
Gold is not a hedge for either stocks or bonds, but performs as a strong safe haven for stocks during bearish markets.
This instrument offers investors an alternative way to ride on the price performance of an underlying asset at a fraction of the underlying asset price, in both bullish and bearish markets.
On June 21, we hit a new high but that breakout failed miserably like most breakouts do in bearish markets.
Lubber added, "This data could be considered remarkable at any point in time, but it is particularly striking when you realize that we had bearish markets for most of the two-year time period covered by this study.