Bear Fund

(redirected from Bear Funds)

Bear Fund

A mutual fund that invests predominately or exclusively in securities that tend to do well when most of the market is performing poorly and that do poorly when the market is performing well. Bear funds are intended to be a safe haven for investors in a down market. Examples of securities that may be found in a bear fund include stocks in budget retailers and fast food restaurants, since they tend to be stable and even experience some earnings growth during recessions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The indictments are expected to cite a personal email sent by one manager to the other that appeared to suggest the Bear funds were in difficulty, days before one of the managers told investors that he was comfortable with the holdings, according to the Wall Street Journal.
3%, bear funds were the top-performing fund category, according to Morningstar.
For some protection, investors can turn to bear funds.
A few caveats: bear funds tend to be more expensive--bear fund fees are in the range of 1.
Direxion's Launch of Leveraged Bull and Bear Funds Marks a First for Russell Global Sectors
There are bear funds that are primarily, if not entirely, short sellers.
The Funds with the word "Bear" in their name (collectively, the "Bear Funds") attempt to provide investment results that correlate negatively to the return of an index or benchmark, meaning that the Bear Funds attempt to move in the opposite or inverse direction of the target index or benchmark.
The company's bear funds, or inverse leveraged index funds, seek daily investment results, before fees and expenses, which seek to move in the opposite or inverse direction of a particular target index or benchmark.
Direxion Funds' bull and bear funds track the S&P 500(R), S&P(R) Mid Cap 400, MSCI(R) US Broad Market, NASDAQ-100(R), Russell 2000(R), MSCI EAFE(R), MSCI Emerging Markets(SM), S&P(R) Latin America 40, and Nikkei(R) 225 indexes.
The company's bear funds, or inverse leveraged index funds, seek daily investment results, before fees and expenses, which seeks to move in the opposite or inverse direction of a particular target index or benchmark.