Batting Average

(redirected from Batting title)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Batting Average

A slang term in business for one's success rate. For example, a salesman making cold calls has a solid batting average if half of his potential clients agree to purchase his products. The term is derived from baseball.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Kell was fairly consistent through the 1949 season, but never gave much thought to winning the batting title because Williams always looked like he was on the verge of piling up ten hits in his next 15 at-bats to make a joke out of the batting race.
In 1957, Musial became the first $100,000 player, and he won the last of his seven batting titles that season.
Since his suspension, Melky has been adamant that he did not want the batting title award, and that he wanted to solely focus on working hard to return to baseball so he could be in a position to win that award with honor.
379 to win the American League batting title, but for all the runs he helped produce, he gave them back by his inability to throw, and this allowed other teams to take an extra base whenever Goslin was forced to handle the ball.
In a 14-year stretch, his masterpieces include seven batting titles (three of those in a row), 14 straight seasons of hitting more than .
9 The six players to win a batting title with two different clubs are Nap Lajoie (A's/Indians), Rogers Hornsby (Cardinals/Braves), Lefty O'Doul (Dodgers/Phillies), Jimmie Foxx (A's/Red Sox), Ernie Lombardi (Reds/Braves) and Bill Madlock (Cubs/Pirates).
300 with Goodman doing it as a utility player, the only utility man ever to win a batting title.
Of the teams Garms played for, his most notable years were with the Pittsburgh Pirates, where in 1940 he won the batting title.
2 Not including Alex Rodriguez and Josh Hamilton, the 13 active players with a league batting title at the end of the 2016 season were DJ LaMahieu, Dee Gordon, Justin Morneau, Buster Posey, Jose Reyes, Carlos Gonzalez, Hanley Ramirez, Matt Holliday and Albert Pujols in the N.
24) Was the first African-American to win an American League batting title.
335 batting average won him the batting title with the Chicago Cubs, helping him finished third in the NL MVP race.
He won the National League batting title and was runner-up for MVP honors in 2007.