Basel Convention

(redirected from Basel Ban)

Basel Convention

A treaty intended to reduce the transfer of hazardous waste across international lines, especially between developed countries and the developing world. Hazardous waste is defined in the treaty as anything considered hazardous waste in the country in which it originated. Interestingly, it does not deal with radioactive waste. It was signed in 1989 and went into effect in 1992.
References in periodicals archive ?
We further urge the government of Canada to pay the Philippines for all the costs incurred in the handling of the Canadian garbage, and to fix the legal loopholes that allowed the unlawful export of garbage from Canada to the Philippines, including ratifying the Basel Ban Amendment.
To put an end to this deceitful and unethical waste dumping that has become a routine practice across the globe, we urge the governments of both Canada and the Philippines to ratify the Basel Ban Amendment, which prohibits hazardous waste transfer from developed to developing countries even for recycling," the group said.
If the Philippine government does not ratify the Basel Ban Amendment, that just may happen.
The Basel Ban Amendment [the Basel Ban] has been hailed as a triumph of international environmental justice by some sectors and criticized by others as counterproductive to environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes.
Even then, many environmental groups and undeveloped nations believed that the terms of the Basel Convention were too weak, and in 1995, protests led to an amendment to the Basel Convention known as the Basel Ban Amendment (the Basel Ban).
The Basel Action Network states that "without the Basel Ban [a treaty banning exports of hazardous waste from rich nations to poor], poorer global communities would be transformed via the 'impeccable logic' of the free market into 'toxic colonies of the rich and most wasteful nations'" (Basel Action Network 1999).
Although technically in effect, the Convention remains unratified by the United States, as does the later Basel Ban Amendment to prohibit (not simply reduce) exports of hazardous wastes from specific developed countries to developing ones.
Further, in 1995 the convention adopted an amendment known as the Basel Ban, which, if enacted, will ban the export of any hazardous waste for any reason from the 29 wealthiest nations of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to any non-OECD nation.
This includes an amendment know as the Basel Ban prohibiting developed countries from exporting hazardous material to industrializing nations like India.