Baseball Card

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Baseball Card

A card containing the name, picture and statistics of a baseball player. Rare cards and first-year cards of players who later became famous (called "rookie cards") are often valuable as collectibles. A baseball card is an example of a valuable but illiquid asset because it can be difficult to sell to a non-collector.
References in periodicals archive ?
On February 5, 2013, Geico agreed to pay $1,010 for the plasma cutter (although it was determined to be worth $1,100) and $1,000 for the baseball cards.
If the original site, the shop, and the video aren't enough, Baseball Card Vandals is also on Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook.
House of Cards: Baseball Card Collecting and Popular Culture
Of course, the popularity of baseball cards, particularly among baby boomers, most of who had lost the cards they had acquired as youngsters, led to a dramatic increase in the number of card publishers about two decades ago.
And before he was a teen-ager, Rogers had paid taxes on the baseball cards he sold.
These days I rarely think about my old baseball cards and comic books.
The Arizona Diamondbacks host the Pittsburgh Pirates May 22 in Phoenix's beautiful Chase Field as the salute to disabled veterans continues and more informative DAV baseball cards are handed out to fans.
Andy was the very best baseball card collector in the world.
Today, Hieberger has 20,000 baseball cards in a collection that he plans to pass on to his two-year-old son, Lucas, "when he's old enough to appreciate them.
CD/DVD packaging Food packaging Drink packaging Video packaging Books Magazines Catalogs T-shirts Billboards Posters Mousepads Wrapping paper Grocery store flyers Baseball cards Greeting cards Calendars Game boards Newsletters Newspapers Menus
The market for individual baseball cards is unique, being completely a secondary market.
Looking at baseball cards, however, allows us to examine evidence based on individual player characteristics, including 'perceived' race.