Barrister

(redirected from Barristers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Barrister

A lawyer who argues before a court and provides specialist advice. A barrister generally does not have direct contact with the client, and may only litigate before a court when instructed by a solicitor. A barrister is not an attorney and may not act on behalf of a client except in conjunction with the solicitor. Barristers and solicitors are most common in common law jurisdictions, especially those with legal roots in Great Britain. Many countries, including the United States, do not distinguish between barristers and solicitors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barristers in Melbourne would have difficulty achieving this end with impunity.
Barristers may also spend a lot of time travelling to the venue where a case or inquiry is being heard.
Navarro also returned a Barrister kickoff 93 yards for a score, giving him 30 career touchdowns, breaking a school record set by Rhuben Williams in 1999.
Cases already taken on by barristers are not affected.
Under this new Act, many barristers feared restraint on both sides would disappear.
Of course, women barristers deny that this is their aim.
He said the barristers should come to Punjab Judicial Academy to deliver lectures.
Chambers Chief Executive Simon Astill said: "James is a terrific recruit for 3PB as we seek to double the size of our operations in Birmingham and Oxford from 30 barristers based from these offices to 60 barristers over the next 12 months.
Hours will typically be standard oce hours, however, you may be required to work longer hours if a barrister is working on a complex case against a pressing deadline.
Barristers Title & Closing Services is pleased to announce the addition of Darleen Dumont as Marketing & Closing Specialist.
But John Elvidge QC, leader of the North Eastern Circuit, accused ministers of drawing up "cynical policies" which "consistently misled the public about the true level of turnover for self employed barristers practising criminal law".