Barrier

(redirected from Barrier methods)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Barrier

1. See: Trade barrier.

2. See: Barrier Option.
References in periodicals archive ?
Managing men: women's dilemmas about overt and covert use of barrier methods for HIV prevention.
In Section 7, we introduce a logarithmic barrier method for finding a local solution to problem (2).
In addition, couples should be advised that correct and consistent use of barrier methods against infection, such as condoms, reduces the risk for other sexually transmitted infections.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that female condoms empower women to initiate barrier method use, and that programs designed to educate potential users about female condoms and familiarize them with the method may be useful.
There is a critical need for sexual and reproductive health rights to be rolled out at clinics and schools, to include increased access to HIV counselling and testing, barrier methods to prevent transmission, and family planning.
Our survey also asked questions on other methods used to prevent GWSS infestations and plant loss, including barrier methods to prevent the entry of GWSS (or otherwise manage GWSS) and the inspections of traps installed by CDFA.
And those who are willing for next conception, options given to adopt IUCD insertion or oral pill consumption or adoption of barrier methods.
Though male condoms are known to be a protective measure, people are still ignorant of the female condom which is the only woman-initiated barrier methods and its benefits.
The largest difference in knowledge was related to method of prevention with 5% in RTI/STI group and 20.04% in non RTI/STI group being aware about the importance of barrier methods to prevent infection.
Barrier methods are less effective than hormonal methods but cause fewer side effects and are associated with less risk.
Of the total number of individuals pending tubal ligation, 46% was not going to use any BC method until they were operated; 24.5% were going to use hormonal methods (15.3% injection and 9.2% the pill); 23.9% barrier methods (17.8% condom, 5.5% IUD, and 0.6% ovules), and 5.5% natural methods like abstinence or the rhythm method (3.7%), and lactational amenorrhea (1.8%).
The method of contraception used was as follows: 9 (8.6%) used barrier methods like condoms; 18 (17.1%) used pills; 49 (46.7%) used injectables; 18 (17.1%) used intrauterine devices; and 11 (10.5%) came for tubal ligation.