bargaining unit

(redirected from Bargaining Units)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Bargaining Unit

A group of employees represented by a union or other organization that is permitted to engage in collective bargaining with an employer.

bargaining unit

see COLLECTIVE BARGAINING.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of these discussions, tentative four-year extension agreements with OPSEU's Unified and Correctional Bargaining Units have been reached.
The NLRB decision allows the contingent staffing company workers to join with the primary employer's workforce in creating these bargaining units without consent from either employer.
Allowing just 223 workers to set up their own bargaining unit could lead to "fragmentation" of employees, with lots of small groups "competing" for the best terms and conditions.
Court of Appeals for District of Columbia Circuit recently granted an Aggregate Industries petition for review of a National Labor Relations Board decision involving the transfer of work between Construction and Ready-Mix bargaining unit drivers represented by Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers Local 631, Las Vegas.
Each bargaining unit functions differently, and each bargaining unit has a "better" way of hearing from its members.
Overall, experts say that San Miguel reminds in-house counsel at acute-care facilities that even though the Health Care Rule outlines eight specific appropriate bargaining units, the board may allow any combination of those.
A bargaining unit is not defined in the legislation, and there is no requirement that workers who sign union cards must be employed full time.
In it, one of the authors suggested that professors may be easily replaceable and thus collective bargaining units could find a new avenue of survival with health, disability, pensions, life insurance and other amenities for the growing army of adjuncts, Snell (2000:8)
The CAC must take into account the need for the unit to be compatible with effective management and the employer's and the unions views; existing national and local bargaining arrangements; the desirability of avoiding small fragmented bargaining units within an undertaking; the characteristics of workers in the proposed bargaining unit and of the employer's other workers whom the CAC considers relevant; and the location of workers.
Hebdon and Stern (1998) found lower arbitration rates among bargaining units of part-time workers, thus providing evidence that contingent workers are less prone to expressions of conflict than are other workers.
Single-employer, single-location bargaining units limit union power.
The chapters on representation case procedure, election procedure, and bargaining units are guidebooks by themselves.