bargaining unit

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Bargaining Unit

A group of employees represented by a union or other organization that is permitted to engage in collective bargaining with an employer.

bargaining unit

see COLLECTIVE BARGAINING.
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In fact, the bargaining strength of such units is so weak that, between 1976 and 1986, only 50 per cent of all certified bargaining units in Ontario secured a first collective agreement.
A 1973 amendment to the National Labor Relations Act placed hospital bargaining units into one of three catetories: professional, nonprofessional, or guards.
As a result of these discussions, tentative four-year extension agreements with OPSEU's Unified and Correctional Bargaining Units have been reached.
O'Brien has also initiated the process for more layoffs, having formally notified the city's municipal employee unions of his plans and identifying the number of positions that require layoffs in each bargaining unit.
Of AFSCME's 22 state-government bargaining units, 12 of them, which represent 20 percent of the union's state-worker members, already have voted to accept the contract.
Studies have examined how organizing outcomes are affected by the political, economic, and legal climate; individual workers' attitudes toward their work and the labor movement; employer characteristics and tactics; and bargaining unit demographics.
The study population was 319 public two-year colleges, 189 of which had faculty bargaining units and 130 of which did not have faculty bargaining.
As I mentioned earlier we have over 30 locals or local bargaining units, which creates the union arm of our organization.
The Attorney-General cleared the air on laws pertaining to the unions and bargaining units.
Each representative on the committee would hold a vote weighted to the proportion of employees from their bargaining unit eligible for health insurance, measured against the total number of eligible employees in all bargaining units.
Both samples are stratified by the size of the bargaining unit: the 1985 sample includes 100% of the strikes in the 1985 FMCS population involving bargaining units of 1,000 or more workers and a random sample of 13% of the strikes in that population involving bargaining units of fewer than 1,000 workers; and the 1989 sample includes 100% of die strikes in the 1989 FMCS population involving bargaining units of 1,000 or more workers and a random sample of 20% of the strikes in that population involving bargaining units of fewer than 1,000 workers.
In a ruling that may have a far-reaching effect on the health care industry, the Supreme Court unanimously upheld a 1989 National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) determination that established "appropriate bargaining units" of hospital employees for collective bargaining purposes (American Hospital Association V.