bar code

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Bar Code

A code placed on a product that a machine can read. Groceries and other products commonly have bar codes on them so a machine can display how much they cost. This ensures accurate prices are paid on retail goods. Bar codes were invented by a graduate student in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1948.

bar code

an alpha or alpha-numeric code, converted into a series of lines and spaces which are marked on products. Bar coding and the use of bar code scanners enables a firm to obtain accurate data quickly on its STOCK position to help with planning its reordering of goods; and can be used to adjust the prices of goods more easily than by replacing price tags. See EPOS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Introduction of Barcode Scanner Industry: Along with Brief Introduction of Barcode Scanner Market it includes Development of Barcode Scanner Industry and Status of Barcode Scanner Market.
PCR success, Barcode gap and PCI potential barcode region was selected.
The aiming guide's cross provides additional precision for targeted scanning in multiple barcode environments
Barcodes are used to track the source, batch and date of manufacture as well as validate the efficacy of pharmaceuticals.
Contact wands--Holding the scanner as you would a pen, draw an imaginary line through the linear barcode symbol, starting on the white margin (called the quiet zone) at one end of the symbol and ending on the white margin at the opposite end.
W&M said it would be able to create bespoke barcodes and promotions for individual retail chains "to build a package unique to their store and customers".
The versatility of a barcode font makes it easy to enable barcodes in office suites and many third party applications that support text display by just a simple installation of the fonts.
Keeping this area clear of any printing enables the application of a readable barcode.
And it was 30 years ago this week that a shop assistant made history by scanning a packet of chewing gum in what was the world's first barcode transaction.
In terms of the physical marking medium, one-dimensional (1D) Code 39-compliant barcode nameplates/labels was the most widely used and affordable solution.
A new type of barcode is too small to see with the naked eye, yet it holds big promise for biomedical research, law enforcement, and everyday life, say researchers.
The most affordable machine vision sensor in the industry utilizes CMOS imaging technology for complete machine vision inspections, barcode reading and OCR.