Balanced Budget Amendment

(redirected from Balanced Budget Amendments)

Balanced Budget Amendment

A proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that would require the federal budget to be in balance or in surplus every fiscal year. Several different versions of the balanced budget amendment have been proposed, and most states have implemented a version of it. Proponents argue it would encourage fiscal responsibility, while critics contend investing with borrowed money can sometimes be beneficial.
References in periodicals archive ?
conducted hearings on balanced budget amendments on at least 23 days
two proposed balanced budget amendments for consideration on the floor.
There are currently a number of proposed Balanced Budget Amendments that have been introduced in the House and Senate.
This is remarkable given that capital expenditures are not usually constrained by balanced budget amendments and perhaps signals that state and local governments are anticipating tight tax revenues for a considerable period.
The states are able to issue long-term debt because state capital projects are outside the restrictions imposed by the balanced budget amendments.
The book's core and unexamined proposition is that populist zealots (including armed militia groups, mad bombers, nativist bigots, states' rights activists, and techno-junkies) and their supposed conservative political allies are wreaking havoc by offering simple solutions, such as term limits and balanced budget amendments, to complex problems.
Instead we witness leadership offering sterile and self-defeating debates on such things as partial birth abortions, balanced budget amendments, and campaign finance.
Hence, in the United States, tax caps and balanced budget amendments aim to make it harder for democratic majorities to reverse course should the new conservatism run aground.
State governments have balanced budget amendments in their Constitutions; why shouldn't the federal government?
Both incoming House Speaker-to-be Gingrich and Dole have agreed that their respective Judiciary Committees will begin action on day one on reporting out balanced budget amendments.
Both the House and Senate rejected constitutional and statutory balanced budget amendments.
two-thirds, and the effort for a balanced budget amendment failed,