Bad Faith


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Bad Faith

Abuse of the law by a party to a lawsuit. That is, one is acting in bad faith if one exploits the law for personal gain. Bad faith can result in the loss of a lawsuit and perhaps in punitive damages. See also: Insurance bad faith.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the challenges and misconceptions that may potentially arise when resolving coverage disputes, insurers should be careful in responding to policy limits and settlement demands to avoid potential bad faith claims.
Landers contended that his damages always exceeded the policy limits and that State Farm had acted in bad faith by delaying payment of the policy limits until after appraisal.
New Jersey also deeply impacted by Sandy, seemingly has held on to its bad faith standard.
The Trademark Office rejected the registration application on grounds of bad faith based on opposition filed by the prior owner.
Although not discussed in detail in the decision, a dismissal of an involuntary petition, particularly on bad faith grounds, can result in significant damage claims against the petitioning creditors.
The bad faith litigation was on behalf of 40 health-care providers, although it was expected to expand to include all of the approximately 441 PIP clients.
In the second lawsuit, Perdido Sun alleged a statutory first-party bad faith claim, pursuant to section 624.
6) This is the rule, irrespective of whether bad faith is alleged with the breach of contract action or brought separately.
National Union provides a comprehensive summary of the current California bad faith standards.
Supreme Court made it easier for the winners of patent litigation to recover attorney's fees, and made it easier to challenge abstract patents, which are most ripe for bad faith assertions.
The insurer can settle on behalf of one insured and face a bad faith claim from the other insured(s), or it can refuse to settle altogether and face a bad faith action from all of its insureds.