Back of Book

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Back of Book

The section of a magazine that comes after most of the content. Advertisers argue that ads in the back of the book have the lowest response rate because so few people read magazines all the way to the end. Nevertheless, back of the book ads usually cost the same as ads elsewhere in the magazine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if the adverts are put at the back of the book, they're being used in conjunction with the book.
Five directors at Bloomsbury Publishing have just cashed in tidy share options on the back of the book's success.
A microwave chapter is included for college students, and readers will enjoy creative sections in the back of the book, including party ideas and pampering recipes.
Regarding stress, Durand deals with it in the Catholic sense by making a thorough examination of conscience (there is an outline at the back of the book for this), going to confession and leaving as much stress as possible in the confessional.
One of the most startling quotes on the back of the book is from historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
There are sixteen small reproductions in the back of the book to help us see from what many of the illustrations are "borrowed." There is also a rich Author's Note which includes much of what is known of Bruegel's life and the situation in the sixteenth century he knew.
I was also dismayed to discover that the twelve endnotes for the introduction were completely absent in the back of the book.
An extensive glossary of current drug terms indexed in the back of the book proves helpful for keeping officers up-to-date on drug culture jargon and helps in translation, if necessary, during street encounters.
Information on testing accommodations, technological aids, an advocacy checklist for parents, a self-awareness checklist for teens, information from the US Department of Education as well as chapter references are included in the back of the book.
In one of the remarkably cant-free essays at the back of the book editor Hans Ibelings writes, 'The disappearance of the compulsive tendency to construe everything in symbolic terms has not only freed the designer from an onerous duty to keep on producing "meaningful" architecture, but has made it possible for architects, critics and historians to view architecture differently in that things are now accepted phenomenologically for what they are.' The layout is a bit lumpy and the texts tend to be about Being Dutch Architects in the Twenty-First Century - but buy it.
The appendices at the back of the book include a who's who of progressive activists in every area.
That's a shame because I think Doris Kearns Goodwin's blurb on the back of the book is right--historians will turn to Johnson when researching America during the Clinton years.