Back Charge

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Back Charge

A fee that a company has charged but has not collected by the end of an accounting period. A company usually sends an invoice for back charges on its own or with the next bill. For example, if one's water bill is $20 per month and one did not pay in April, one will likely have a bill for $40 (plus late charges) in May.
References in periodicals archive ?
One bill came in smaller, another was what we predicted, but the last included hundreds of dollars in back charges, and we couldn't say what the exact dimensions of the package were.
com, said when customers attempt to claw back charges banks will typically repay lower amounts, hoping this will settle the dispute.
When we discovered a million electricity users were facing hefty back charges because meters were not adjusted for price rises, the Sheriff went in with six-shooters blazing.
But Human Rights Watch, in a report released today, said they had found no evidence to back charges that hundreds of Palestinians were massacred at Jenin.
Without it now, they risk being hit by carriers with back charges levied on the shipping warehouse.
However, the general contractor may later assert back charges against the sub or claim that the subcontractor never completed its contract.
Gilliland needed all the car could offer to hold back charges from both second-place finisher Barry Bradshaw and third-place finisher Brandon Loverock of Norwalk.
Now the council has agreed to pay pounds 145,000 in back charges which will push next year's estimated council tax bill of pounds 800 for the average Band D property up by about pounds 2 per person.
After an IRS audit, when you add up all the back charges and penalties IRS can assess, both the contractors and the newspapers can be badly damaged," he added.
Unbilled back charges can become uncollectible over time.
On election day, California voters enacted Proposition 103, requiring insurers to roll back charges for automobile and certain property/casualty insurance coverages to the levels prevailing on November 7, 1987, to reduce such premiums an additional 20 percent and to freeze them until November 8, 1989.
But it would be unlikely he would be able to do this even if he does bring back charges, given the financial challenges currently faced by the NHS.