back order

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Back Order

An order by a customer that cannot be filled because the seller does not have the good in stock. A retailer may have a back order at a wholesaler, which may cause a back order from a consumer to that retailer. A large number of back orders may indicate poor inventory management.

back order

see BACKLOG.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, back-order measures can be a source of confusion because inventory managers may report back orders with or without an associated duration.
Although the reduction was driven in part by an overall reduction in Navy flying hours, Scott said DSCR personnel contributed to the back order reduction in several ways:
Perhaps the most challenging thing is where are you actually going to get the back order magazines and newspapers from.
We chose Cat Logistics to handle our parts distribution because of their standard of work and they also are increasing their manpower resources by ten per cent to focus on the back orders we have on our books,' said the spokeswoman.
Inventory status for all sizes across all warehouses can be displayed and the user has the option to accept back orders from their default warehouse or to select items from other warehouses.
After the desired items are scanned, the order is then sent directly to the facility's computer, where it can be reviewed for back orders or substitution suggestions, and then sent for processing.
Meanwhile, back orders are also piling up for Merck and Co.
Most e-commerce sites offer various shipping options including next-clay or second-day air, although some back orders may take extra time to reach you (or your recipient's) door.
The good news is, there are ways to deal with back orders.
Plus, EX-TRA's accounting features track partial shipments, back orders and cancellations.
As a result, they now were obligated to fill a back order to this customer--along with back orders to others who want to buy this item, many of whom are paying higher prices because of smaller discounts.
2 percent, inventories have fallen to a 10-year low, and back orders are rising rapidly.