Baby Boomers


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Baby Boomers

A generation of children born in the years following World War II. While there is debate about the years in which baby boomers were born, the U.S. Census Bureau defines the generation as being born between 1946 and 1964. The baby boomer generation was one of the largest in U.S. history and had a significant cultural and economic impact. Their impact on American social programs like Social Security and Medicare is expected to increase significantly as they retire in larger numbers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baby boomers are largely viewed as individualistic and self-centered, and more than 50 per cent of the country's disposable income resides with this demographic.
Emerging tech in retail stores is most attractive to millennials (50 percent) followed by Gen Z (38 percent), Gen X (35 percent) and baby boomers (20 percent).
Critique: A unique and entertainingly riveting read from cover to cover, "Shooting the Breeze With Baby Boomer Stars!: Surprising Celebrity Conversations for the Retro Generation" is an extraordinary and highly recommended addition to community library collections.
An annual survey of baby boomer retirement expectations by the Insured Retirement Institute found that 45 percent of boomers have no savings for their golden years.
The national median was about $25,000 for baby boomer debts, Lending Tree said, noting that "loans and credit card balances account for the largest share of these balances."
Millennials (49 percent) were twice as likely as Baby Boomers (20 percent) to pay someone back using a peer-to-peer banking app than a physical currency like cash or check.
According to accountancy firm Moore Stephens, the tax burden has fallen 4 per cent in the past year for the baby boomer generation - those born between 1946 and 1965 - as millennials, born between 1977 and 1995, paid an extra PS5 billion in tax.
Figures from the Office for National Statistics show that a higher proportion of World War One baby boomers remained childless compared to those who came after them.
r aby Nearly a fifth (18 per cent) of World War One baby boomers smoked at the age of 70.
Twenty percent of baby boomers attribute their increase in savings to a paycheck bump, and the same amount say they have a better understanding of how to set up a budget and have cut a recurring luxury expense