Baby Bills

(redirected from Baby Bill)

Baby Bills

A hypothetical, tongue-in-cheek name given to potential companies that would have been created if Microsoft had been broken up as a result of the antitrust suit brought against it in the late 1990s. The name derives from baby bells, which were the companies created after AT&T's break-up, and Bill Gates, the founder of Microsoft. As Microsoft was not broken up, the name became moot. See also: United States vs. Microsoft.
References in periodicals archive ?
Six months later they did meet One another in the street How's the wife the doctor cried She's having a baby Bill replied Oh, and there's something else that I must tell The lodger's having one as well Doug Sharkey, via email Bommy Night THE fizz the wizz the booms and the bang.
Monica has no time for Frank feeling sorry for himself however; she's still mourning the death of Baby Bill. The 'funeral' provides an opportunity for a host of old faces to return, including Fiona (a welcome return for Anne Marie Duff) back from Amsterdam, and intent on taking Stella and the surviving twin back to live with her and husband Steve, to a 'normal' life.
Mum swept up the bedclothes and followed Dad up the path into the house, leaving baby Bill til last in his Moses basket.
The 2001 baby bill of pounds 36,956 is revealed in Pregnancy & Birth magazine.
TRAGIC PAST: baby Bill Oddie with his mother Lillian' MONSTERS: on The Truth About Killer Dinosaurs' SPRING: with Simon King and Kate Humble' WE ARE FAMILY: with wife Laura and daughter Rosie, aged three' FUNNYMAN: Bill with fellow Goodies Graeme Garden and Tim Brooke-Taylor
WORDS OF WISDOM: Bill Oddie discovers family secrets; ON THE BALL: rugby-playing Bill Oddie, centre, during his schooldays in Birmingham; MYSTERY: baby Bill with mum Lillian; FATHER FIGURE: Harry Oddie, who brought son Bill up
These include splitting the company into three "Baby Bills"; altering the company's organizational structure so its divisions would be in competition; giving the Windows source code away, or auctioning it off to Microsoft competitors.
Finally, Jackson may propose remedies - suggestions have ranged from splitting the company apart into "Baby Bills", to opening the application programming interfaces or source code to the Windows operating system, to slapping Microsoft on the wrist, to doing nothing.
In fact, Seattle's high-tech future is virtually assured, thanks to companies like Microsoft, Netscape, Nintendo and a plethora of "Baby Bills," the name given to start-up companies run by Microsoft veterans.
And the baby bills are not the only bills, although they are our priority.'
In a paper titled "United We Fall, Divided We Stand," Fenik argues that even if Microsoft were broken into four "Baby Bills," shareholder value would be preserved and Microsoft's ability to compete in a broad range of markets would continue undiminished.