Baby Bell


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Baby Bell

Any of seven telecommunications companies that were formed from AT&T after its antitrust break-up in 1984. In that year, AT&T was determined to be so large that it violated antitrust law in the United States and it was forced to spin off seven subsidiaries, which became known as the baby bells. Few of the baby bells still exist as independent companies, as most have gone through a series of mergers and acquisitions in the years since.

Baby Bell

One of several integrated-communications providers that were formerly part of AT&T but became independent in 1984 following AT&T's court-ordered divestiture. The seven original Baby Bells were once operating subsidiaries of AT&T that provided local and intrastate long-distance service.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the judge's directory services decision had an immediate financial impact, the open door to diversification represented the most exciting strategic impact on Jack MacAllister and his Baby Bell.
It would be prohibitively expensive for competitors to duplicate all of the critical elements of the Baby Bell MANs - conduit, fiber, and right-of-way portfolios - at all quickly.
On October 7, a federal appeals court gave the seven Baby Bells, all telephone monopolies in their respective regions, permission to begin providing information services over their lines.
In particular, the Baby Bell providers of local phone service opposed the bill, and Republican leader Robert Dole did their bidding.
One Baby Bell executive has hailed Judge Greene's ruling as a victory for American consumers, business and the economy.
The day after the California earthquake, marketing consultants for the Baby Bell phone companies rushed out a press release.
Sprint had been discussing a merger with MCI Worldcom for two weeks but received a $100 billion unsolicited offer Saturday from BellSouth, the Atlanta-based Baby Bell company, prompting MCI Worldcom to raise its bid Monday.
The making of the deal began early last year, while Burrell was handling the account of the New York region's baby Bell telephone company, Nynex, according to Burrell.
The Baby Bell offers wireless cable television services in New Orleans, Atlanta, Orlando and Tampa.
The Baby Bell has more than 1,000 employee development programs, which range from career development workshops to counseling and educational programs.
Critics of the cable industry like to point to satellite and Baby Bell competition as risks.
Integra Telecom is a fast-growing, integrated communications carrier committed to providing a local, high-quality service alternative to the incumbent, monopoly Baby Bell telecom providers.