Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
MILITANT ORGANIZATIONS HAVE PROLIFERATED IN IRAQ SINCE the fall of the Baathist regime in 2003.
Both the Baathists and Islamic militants were able to cultivate support from ordinary Sunnis who were alienated by the sectarian policies of former Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.
The Baathists were Arab nationalists and, by inclination, secular.
Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki surprised both Baathists and his political partners by calling for a constitutional freeze and the prohibition of the Baath Party under the Iraqi constitution, the pan-Arab daily ASHARQ AL AWSAT said on Thursday.
forces captured 615 baathists accused of planning to undermine the political
Those peoples' objections to the Ministry of Education's decision of returning the teachers who were considered as baathists is similar to the former regime's decision of expelling the non baathists.
"The return of Baathists to power would be disappointing because they will take revenge and their revenge will be very severe," Hussain said.
In his first news conference since the Baathist ballot purge, Ahmad Chalabi said that the Accountability and Justice Committee that he heads "managed to reach results supporting [the] constitution."Aa
Calling for Baathists' participation in Iraq's elections is against the Iraqi people and Iraq's Constitution, politicians say.
The Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki emphasized that they will not allow the return of Baathists to the country's political process.
Several hundred protesters congregated outside Baghdad provincial government headquarters, carrying banners that read "No to the return of criminal Baathists," and "No Baathists or Saddam."
The Iraqi government said it suspected that Baathists, whose political party Saddam once led, were behind the broadcasts.