Baath Party

(redirected from Baathism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.
Related to Baathism: Ba'ath

Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
Baathism has a terrible reputation in this country, but if you read the Syrian constitution it sounds much like our own.
These actions of the party are not new if compared to the legacy left by the similar movements such as the Nassirism, the Nationalism, the Baathism, the Islamism and others.
He became involved in Baathism at a young age and organized against the government of Abdul Karim Qassim.
But the commission defended the ban saying it is in compliance with article 7 of the Iraqi constitution which bans all political parties promoting Baathism and sectarianism and stated that the National Dialogue Front was just one out of 15 candidate lists that were rejected for the same reason.
I was a member in the party because I believe in Baathism, and I am convinced of the ideology.
Kandris, "Asad's Legacy and the Future of Baathism in Syria" (master's thesis, National Defense Intelligence College, 2005), p.
They all had official ideologies (Kim Il Sungism, Maoism and Baathism, respectively) that were as secular as they could be.
Since, putting parallels to one side and neglecting total numbers of deaths, Applebaum spoke of the phenomena of totalitarianism and, tellingly, Baathism.
Despite the attempt to purge Baathism from Iraqi society, for example, Bowen reveals the many ways this ancien regime persists.
Baathism ultimately became a tool to control society rather than an ideology of progress while fear of the regime quickly became the cement which bound together this ethnically and religiously diverse country.
The leaders of Yemen's communist movement and their Arab communist backers saw themselves as a third alternative, a rejection to the Nasserist trend that overtook Egypt and Baathism that overtook Iraq and Syria.
Saddam, a Sunni who had espoused Baathism, an essentially secular Arab nationalist ideology, had been a bulwark against Iran's efforts to export Islamism.