Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
The choice of a Soviet company was made mainly for security reasons, in view of threats then from Saddam's Ba'thist regime in Iraq.
Providing numerous examples from the lives of the Iraqi people, he sheds light on the strategies through which the Ba'thist regime established control over the people.
Fadavi further noted Iran's strong resistance against the Iraqi invasion in the 1980s, and said Iran could repel the former Ba'thist regime of Iraq in those years while Iranians had just moved passed a revolution and the country was much weaker than what it is today and Iraqis were supported by many countries.
Following a positive relationship with Washington, the Ba'thist regime was recast after the 1990 Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, and again when it was drafted into the Bush administration's "War on Terror" after the attacks of September 11.
In view of the extraordinarily high stakes it is useful to compile a preliminary balance sheet of the situation in the various parts of Iraq six months after the overthrow of the Ba'thist regime.
It provides a political history of modern Iraq with critical observation of the Ba'thist regime which has ruled since 1968.
In 1966, however, the Ba'thist regime was taken over by members of Syria's Alawite minority who re-made the party to suit their interests, as well as the armed forces and numerous security units.
He was believed to have been assassinated by the Ba'thist regime because he tried to enlarge his religious activities for re-establishing hawza and to increase its relation with society through the Friday Prayer.
What is happening to the Alawite/ Ba'thist regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria - facing a stubborn Sunni-led revolution since March 15, 2011 - will affect Iran's Shi'ite theocracy which heads an axis of what it calls "anti-US/anti-Israel forces" in the Greater Middle East (GME).
The fields were not damaged during the war, despite fears that the Ba'thist regime would set fire to the wells.
Therefore, Saddam Hussein's dictatorial Ba'thist regime was far from representing the model to be imitated because, in the eyes of the Maghrebis and other Arabs, this type of regime had serious limitations.
Saddam in 1979 toppled Bakr and established his own Ba'thist regime, which proved to be the worst dictatorship in Iraq's modern history.