Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
The identified person, who has been an active Ba'athist during the era of former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, seized the opportunity and chanted slogans against the Iraqi resistance and Iran during the Saturday protests," he added.
Indeed, the Islamic State's military campaigns illustrate that in some cases it improved Ba'athist methods while in others the organization adapted these teachings directly to the current conflict.
Ashes of Hama uncovers the major aspects of the Islamist struggle: from the Brotherhood's radicalisation and its "jihad" against the Ba'athist regime and subsequent exile, to a spectacular comeback at the forefront of the Syrian revolution in 2011--a remarkable turnaround for an Islamist movement which all analysts had pronounced dead amid the ruins of Hama in 1982.
Bashar is not simply a Ba'athist thug," argues Ammar Abdulhamid, a Syrian author who has lived in the Washington, D.
He remains commander of the Popular Army, the Ba'athist militia, but is now considered to be a secondary figure.
Some observers see these developments as signs of the Ba'athist regime's impending collapse but that is an overreach.
Army and Ba'ath Party soon after taking office, then partly reversed that move a year later, in April 2004, when he reinstated former Ba'athist officers relatively untainted by the old regime.
Satar's employee Jalil had spent two years in a Ba'athist prison for selling tapes of subversive sermons.
THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION has committed itself to prosecuting Saddam Hussein and other high-ranking Iraqi Ba'athist leaders before a war crimes tribunal like that established for the former Yugoslavia.
AS THE CIVIL WAR in Syria rages on, there is ample evidence pointing to the activities of foreign interests--nation states and non-state actors--opposed to the Ba'athist regime in Damascus.
But the same would be true of members of Saddam Hussein's secular Ba'athist party.