Baath Party

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Baath Party

A political party in the Middle East advocating secular, socialist policies intended to free Arab-majority countries from Western influence. It was established in 1940 in Syria. Its Syrian and Iraqi branches split in 1955 and became antagonistic toward each other. It became the ruling party of Syria in 1963 and was in charge of Iraq from 1968 until 2003.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the occasion of the 28th anniversary of 1987 chemical bombardment of Iran's Northwestern city of Sardasht by the Iraqi Ba'ath regime of Saddam, Zarif called on the international community to carry out their "legal and moral responsibility" towards the victims and their families and pave the ground for the punishment of the perpetrators and supporters of such inhumane acts.
Internally, from independence in 1946 to the rise of Hafez al-Assad's Ba'ath regime in 1970, the country's political scene was dominated by coup after coup.
He said: "Saddam Hussein's Ba'ath regime was a devastatingly brutal and murderous time, and many Kurds lived in fear of their lives and still do.
He also said "that some do not condemn what Iraq had passed through and wants to cancel accountability and justice for whitening the rule of Ba'ath regime and al-Qaeda and terrorism.
Tehran's commitment to the Ba'ath regime may be strategic, and Damascus might have little to say as to how brutal operations are carried out, which was even worse than many assumed.
Shiryan said the worst outcomes of such statements were the interpretations that circulated in Western media and "which saw that the Syrian regime will keep on exploiting what is happening in the region in order to put pressure on some countries to support it and maintain their silence over the mistakes committed" by the Ba'ath regime.
The Ba'ath Regime claimed that a new census would determine the status of Kirkuk and other oil-rich Kurdish territories.
The Ba'ath regime took extreme measures in the 1980s and 1990s to expel Kurds, Turkmen, and Christians from the city and replacing the indigenous population with Arabs.
Saddam and the seven top officials from his Ba'ath regime face a possible death sentence if convicted
Immediately following the collapse of the Ba'ath regime a year ago, Sadr's last remaining son, Muqtada, who had been living in hiding, used his father's network to establish offices throughout the country, seizing mosques, religious centers, former Ba'athist headquarters, and even hospitals.
True, the Ba'ath regime had committed indisputable acts of aggression against Iran and (more relevantly) Kuwait in the past.