BTU


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British Thermal Unit

The energy needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit. It is used in the United Kingdom, the United States, and a few other countries to measure the energy used by appliances like heaters and air conditioners. In the metric system, the equivalent of the British thermal unit is the joule. It is abbreviated BTU.

BTU

See British thermal unit.
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The Energy Star emblem is on 37 machines, including the new Compact Programmable series, 5,000 to 12,000 BTUs, with remote electronic controls.
Another way the BTU tax could increase pollution is by favoring ethanol, which the administration wants to exempt from the tax.
The BTU tax would directly increase the cost of gas purchased for all municipal vehicles, the costs for all lighting and electric consumption, and the costs of heating and cooling all municipal facilities.
Danby's line spans from 5,000 to 18,000 BTUs, most with electronic controls, three-speed fan and cool, slideout chassis and oscillating air swing.
There's a redesigned chassis for all machines 15,000 BTUs and larger, with better air flow and more attractive controls.
L4: AC 9000 BTU / h = 2 pcs; AC 12000 BTU / h = 3 pcs;
The line will be from 9,000 to 24,000 BTUs, with new chassis on mid-sized models.
van der Wansem, chairman and chief executive officer of BTU said, This transaction brings significant benefits to our clients, employees and stockholders .
Capacities span from 5,400 to 20,500 BTUs and energy-efficiency ratings run from 8.
We are very pleased to leverage the technology to benefit BTU and the solar energy industry, as we share a commitment to innovation and greater sustainability.
We recognize that when the solar industry is ramping at a rapid pace, it is a difficult time for customers to change their manufacturing process," said Paul van der Wansem, chairman and CEO of BTU.