B-Share

B-Share

A share in a mutual fund to which a fee is charged when the share is sold within a certain number of years. That is, when an investor initially buys a B-share, he/she agrees to pay a third party (usually a financial institution or broker) a certain percentage of the share's value if he/she decides to sell it within five to 10 years, depending on the specific nature of the agreement. The fee usually declines by the year until the maximum number of years is reached. A B-share is one type of load fund. See also: A-share, C-share, No-load fund.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Recipharm B-share (RECI B) is listed on Nasdaq OMX Stockholm.
Each A-share entitles ten votes, while each B-share entitles one vote.
Failure to get promoted at the first attempt would mean a reduction of a quarter of this A-share funding for the second season plus the complete loss of their B-share funding, but bounce back straight away and not a penny of central revenue is lost.
We share the view, that from VW's perspective this seems the smartest way to create a truck group, especially if partly financed by a Scania B-share capital increase," said Commerzbank analyst Daniel Schwarz.
3% (front- Fees (varies end load is with product *) extra) Category of fees B-share C-share No-load funds for comparison funds funds w/ a fee Front-end load?
Dividends in Asia Pacific have risen five-fold during the last decade; meanwhile dividends from Chinese companies (listed in Hong Kong, B-share and offshore markets) grew from $8 billion in 1998 to more than $70 billion by 2008.
SPIAs typically pay only a 3 percent commission, compared to 4 percent for load mutual funds, up to 7 percent for B-share variable annuities and 8 percent for indexed annuities.
In August 1991, Konka was restructured into a Sino-foreign public share-hold company and on March 1992, the company's A-share and B-share were listed on the Shenzhen Stock Exchange.
In the Shanghai market, the proportion of the state- and B-share (foreign) markets seem to declining while ownership of the legal-person and public share markets seem to increase.
Chinese companies listed on international markets -- including China's B-share market that is nominally reserved for foreign investors -- have long needed to submit international accounting standard reports.
In China, the B-share markets in Shanghai and Shenzhen lost 5.
93) The effect of the enforcement of such rules and regulations has been a slowing of market expansion and a decrease in the number of B-Share listings.