B-Share

B-Share

A share in a mutual fund to which a fee is charged when the share is sold within a certain number of years. That is, when an investor initially buys a B-share, he/she agrees to pay a third party (usually a financial institution or broker) a certain percentage of the share's value if he/she decides to sell it within five to 10 years, depending on the specific nature of the agreement. The fee usually declines by the year until the maximum number of years is reached. A B-share is one type of load fund. See also: A-share, C-share, No-load fund.
References in periodicals archive ?
04 credit facilities shall be converted into class B-share capital.
The Recipharm B-share (RECI B) is listed on Nasdaq Stockholm.
As part of the arrangement, all of CapMan's A-shareholders have agreed to convert their A-shares into B-shares in accordance with CapMan's articles of association so that one (1) A-share corresponds to one (1) B-share and to vote at CapMan's extraordinary general meeting in favour of amending CapMan's Articles of Association so that CapMan only has one share series.
Each A-share entitles ten votes, while each B-share entitles one vote.
Failure to get promoted at the first attempt would mean a reduction of a quarter of this A-share funding for the second season plus the complete loss of their B-share funding, but bounce back straight away and not a penny of central revenue is lost.
The offer values ElektronikGruppen at SEK213m and is a premium of 31% to its B-share close on 21 June.
We share the view, that from VW's perspective this seems the smartest way to create a truck group, especially if partly financed by a Scania B-share capital increase," said Commerzbank analyst Daniel Schwarz.
25% service fee (which is the main source of Class A and B-share trail commissions), and a 0.
3% (front- Fees (varies end load is with product *) extra) Category of fees B-share C-share No-load funds for comparison funds funds w/ a fee Front-end load?
Dividends in Asia Pacific have risen five-fold during the last decade; meanwhile dividends from Chinese companies (listed in Hong Kong, B-share and offshore markets) grew from $8 billion in 1998 to more than $70 billion by 2008.
SPIAs typically pay only a 3 percent commission, compared to 4 percent for load mutual funds, up to 7 percent for B-share variable annuities and 8 percent for indexed annuities.
A-share stocks are traded by domestic residents, and B-share stocks are traded primarily by foreign investors on both the Shanghai and the Shenzhen exchanges, effectively creating four separate markets.