Authoritarian


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Authoritarian

A person who believes in or is involved with a political or economic system characterized by submission to authority, whether it is a person, party, or class. In an authoritarian society, the individuals exist to serve the state or ruling power. The authority may rule arbitrarily; that is, it is not bound by its own laws. This concept is opposed to democracy, individualism, and the rule of law. Democratic societies are thought to offer greater impetus for long-term economic growth, although authoritarian counterexamples exist.
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Much activity undertaken by authoritarian regimes - whether it is China in Latin America, or Russia in Central Europe - falls outside of this definition, as colleagues and I detailed in a December 2017 report, "Sharp Power: Rising Authoritarian Influence.
Interestingly, Luttig observes that "some of the strongest members of the Democratic Party are highly authoritarian Whites, individuals typically believed to be members of the White working class.
Cheng said the purpose of transitional justice was to restore truth in history, particularly facts about those who had been politically prosecuted or suppressed by the authoritarian government, instead of laying the blame on the governments of the Martial Law era.
By heightening the international salience of autocratic abuse, increasing the likelihood of Western response, expanding the number of domestic actors with a stake in avoiding international isolation, and shifting the balance of resources and prestige in favor of oppositions, linkage raised the cost of building and sustaining authoritarian rule.
Drawing from the conceptualization of Paola Cesarini and Katherine Hite ("Introducing the Concept of Authoritarian Legacies," in Nancy Gina Bermeo, ed.
A negative correlation was found between the perceived authoritarian parenting style and social adjustment, however it was not statistically significant ((P>0.
Lee argues that the main factor determining the success or failure of popular revolts is the military's response--whether the armed forces defect and side with the protesters or suppress the mass demonstrations and uphold authoritarian rule.
In the cases of both the Philippines and Indonesia, personalism within the military led to growing factionalism, and, when popular protests erupted, personalism and the dictator's direct interference in military affairs motivated unhappy senior officers to abandon the authoritarian regime and ally with disillusioned domestic civilian forces and major figures in the local opposition movement.
According to Altemeyer's (1996) theory, RWA is composed of the three distinct dimensions of authoritarian aggression, authoritarian submission, and conventionalism.
This may work for some time, but definitely not for a long period -- for one simple reason: In the long term, authoritarian tendencies are likely to destabilize and erode some of the NATO countries.
The authors examine the official justifications behind US support of authoritarian regimes and look at the consequences in the past and present.
For Mexican-American children, authoritarian parenting--defined as strict, controlling, and not responsive to the child's feelings--was correlated with depression.