Right of Return

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Right of Return

The legal right that an individual has to go back to his/her country. The right of return is guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but there is debate about what is meant by "country," whether it refers to one's physical place of birth or the state with which one's ethnicity is associated. The right of return remains controversial in many places, notably Israel and the Palestinian territories.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The search takes her into a vast geographic matrix: from her home in Toronto to Abbotsford, BC to interview her dying father, then to the homes of the Soviet Aussiedler community in Germany, on to the sites of the once-good life in Ukraine, then farther along the Trans-Siberian into the interior of Russia, to the western Ural Mountains, the northern gulag, the black soils of Omsk, Siberia, into the heart of Kazakhstan and beyond, always finding still more cousins.
For the period from 1995 to 2002, 43 percent of net migration consisted of Germans, attracted by the generous resettlement package for the aussiedler and the strong German economy.
Indeed, it may be denied that fellow ethnics are really immigrants at all, as was the case with Germany's postwar Aussiedler policy.
Under its Aussiedler policy, for example, Germany gave extensive social support and easy access to citizenship to people whose ancestors had left Germany hundreds of years before and who sometimes spoke no German, while it effectively excluded from citizenship other people who had lived in Germany their entire lives, such as the descendants of Turkish guest workers.
Even without the naturalized Aussiedler naturalization is quite comparable with other OECD countries.
474 Aussiedler being naturalized and two years later, in 1998, when 106,790 other immigrants became German citizens.
The number of Aussiedler officially established in the east through 1998 (assuming equal shares in East and West Berlin) represented 1.
The ethnic German population consists of Vertriebene ("expellees") and Aussiedler ("transferees"), who resided primarily in German settlements in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.
The conservative government which won the elections of 1994 only with the help of the Aussiedler vote, directed the negative attitudes of the population at the asylum seekers.
In the case of Aussiedler and Spaetaussiedler, their entry into the Federal Republic is codified in the 1953 Federal Expellee and Refugee Law as amended in 1993 and is based upon Vertreibungsdruck (expulsion pressure), and their inability reclaim their lands in the former Volga Republic.