Australian Dollar

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Australian Dollar

The currency of Australia. It was introduced in 1966, replacing the Australian pound. It was initially pegged to the British pound, but later pegged to the U.S. dollar in 1967. It is now a floating currency and is one of the most widely traded currencies in the world. It is especially important in the South Pacific region, where a number of small nations either use the Australian Dollar or peg their currencies to it at a 1:1 ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Aussie dollar has strengthened by about 20 per cent since 2009, and half Gorgon's costs are in the currency, oil prices are up about 80 per cent in that time.
4 Aussie dollars during 2008, that has fallen by more than a third to 1.
Aussie Dollar finished fourth and progressed further when last seen at Kempton just 13 days ago.
One Aussie dollar buys one Aussie dollar's worth of anything in Oz.
Who's on the Money is a clear presentation of the facts surrounding the formulation and development of our Aussie dollar, as well as a thoughtful presentation of the stories behind the faces that we see so regularly, perhaps without knowing who and why.
Across the ditch it seems that the consistent strength of the Aussie dollar and "dampened economic conditions" have tempered export confidence, with sales forecasts for the next 12 months down by ten percentage points on the November 2004 results.
Australia offers a great quality of life - good weather and good value on the part of the Aussie dollar.
The dramatic ECB and Bank of Japan QE ensure that dollar strength will continue in 2015, meaning that commodities currencies like the Aussie dollar, Canadian dollar, Malaysian ringgit and South African rand will continue to depreciate.
Figures from the central bank showed that it was looking to trim down a rebounding Aussie dollar, as it was among the biggest threats to an economic recovery as a mining slowdown deepens.
As per SSgA's head of SPDR ETFs in Australia Amanda Skelly, "The value of the Aussie dollar relative to other currencies, like the US dollar, has historically been very volatile and this can have a significant impact on the value of an investor's international investment.
While the decision to keep interest rates unchanged had been widely expected, the Aussie dollar dropped in reaction to the Reserve Bank of Australia's statement that the local currency was still high, despite its recent slide.
The Aussie dollar has started the week on the back foot, struggling to retain parity against the greenback," said CMC Markets trader Niall King.