Audience


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Audience

1. The persons who watch, listen to, or read a medium such as a television show or a magazine, or who are likely to do so.

2. The persons who are the targets of an advertising campaign, or the persons who have actually been exposed to it.
References in classic literature ?
The audience yelled its appreciation of Danny's display of sporting spirit.
I was asked now to speak to an audience composed of the wealth and culture of the white South, the representatives of my former masters.
Bite 'm!" voices from the recovered audience were shouting.
His business in life, whereby he lived, was to appear in a cage of performing leopards before vast audiences, and to thrill those audiences by certain exhibitions of nerve for which his employers rewarded him on a scale commensurate with the thrills he produced.
The play began, with all the proper accompaniments of a theatrical performance in private life; with a crowded audience, an African temperature, a bursting of heated lamp-glasses, and a difficulty in drawing up the curtain.
The thread of the argument had been rudely broken, and the audience was restless and expectant.
The stage, therefore, was a 'platform stage,' seen by the audience from almost all sides, not, as in our own time, a 'picture-stage,' with its scenes viewed through a single large frame.
Matai Shang was wise enough to seem to accept the mandate of his follower, and promised to bring the two slave women to the audience chamber on the morrow.
She had a marvelously flexible voice and wonderful power of expression; the audience went wild over her selection.
"John Carter," he cried, "take your place upon the Pedestal of Truth to be judged impartially according to your acts and here to know the reward you have earned thereby." Then turning to and fro toward the audience he narrated the acts upon the value of which my reward was to be determined.
If not the greatest actor of his day, Kynaston was the greatest of the 'boy-actresses.' So exalted was his reputation 'that,' says Downes, 'it has since been disputable among the judicious, whether any woman that succeeded him so sensibly touched the audience as he.'"
Among the earlier speakers not one was inspired by a feeling of mercy for the audience. The chairman reveled in words.