Attribution Theory


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Attribution Theory

The concept stating that people make decisions based on the factors they believe caused their present situations and seek to emulate or avoid those real or perceived causes. For example, if one believes investing in cotton caused one's bankruptcy, one may be unlikely to invest in cotton again, whether or not the supposition is true.
References in periodicals archive ?
Attribution theory focuses on perceived causes and their effects on actions (Polices 1984).
The role of attribution theory within the context of leadership has been well defined through numerous research contributions (Green and Mitchell, 1979; Knowlton and Mitchell, 1980; Ilgen and Knowlton, 1980; Mitchell and Wood, 1980).
Similarly, attribution theory has also been investigated amongst competitive athletes (Furst, 1989; Furst & Tenenbaum, 1989; McAuley, 1985; McAuley, Russel & Gross, 1985; Russel, 1982; Tenenbaum & Furst, 1986).
Reflections on the history of attribution theory and research-people, personalities, publications, problems.
s claim on one hand, it is however also important to recognize that their emphasis was limited to the internal and external dimensions of the attribution theory (Kelley, 1967) through which they explained its relationship with embedded CSR only.
Finally, the fourth model, which was also consistent with attribution theory and color-in-context theory but also accounted for the observers' attribution effect, represented a more complex relationship between essay assessments and student and instructor perceptions.
Building on the defensive attribution theory literature (Walster, 1966), we argue that the impact on consumer's brand evaluation depends on outcome severity and locus of causality, that is, whether the cause of the failure was the consumer, the brand, or a natural disaster.
Attribution theory focuses on how entities interpret events (such as FFE activities) and attribute outcomes of the events to various causes (Heider, 1958).
Attribution theory posits that individuals ascribe different levels of responsibility to actors based on the outcome of the actors' actions and whether or not the individuals believe that the actors should have done something else (Heider 1958).
Attribution theory is a concept from social psychology that addresses the processes by which people explain the causes of events (Rees, Ingledew, & Hardy, 2005; Wann, 1997; Weiner, 1985).
Attribution theory describes behavior, attachment theory provides insight into the ability to form meaningful relationships with others, social learning and behavior theories suggest that behavior may be increased or reduced through rewards and consequences, and emotional intelligence theory relates to diversity.