Attitude

(redirected from Attitudes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Attitude

A subjective measure of how one or more persons feel about an event, person, or object. Marketers attempt to measure attitudes of consumers to determine the products they may buy. Likewise, analysts measure investor attitudes to estimate future market movements. See also: Sentiment indicator, Behavioral economics.
References in classic literature ?
To all this the captive made no reply; but was content to preserve an attitude in which dignity was singularly blended with disdain.
At the next moment he resumed his quiet and reclining attitude against the post.
This young lady loves you with an H,' the King said, introducing Alice in the hope of turning off the Messenger's attention from himself--but it was no use--the Anglo-Saxon attitudes only got more extraordinary every moment, while the great eyes rolled wildly from side to side.
Haigha replied eagerly, coming in front of Alice to introduce her, and spreading out both his hands towards her in an Anglo-Saxon attitude.
So I faced round quickly, and took up a position in the prow, where I leant with careless grace upon the hitcher, in an attitude suggestive of agility and strength.
It is only the men of her kind who war upon us, and I have ever thought that their attitude toward us is but the reflection of ours toward them.
And again the boat appeared and the Fay, but about the attitude of the latter there was more of care and uncertainty and less of elastic joy.
You are adopting an attitude, sir," he said, "which, however much I may admire it from one point of view, seems to me scarcely to take into account the facts of the situation.
When he paused to contemplate the attitude of the police toward himself and his fellows, he believed that they were the only men in the city who had no rights.
Brewer, who had observed them at the same moment, was leaning forward in an attitude of rapt attention, horribly pale.
Von Horn had attempted to sound the girl that he might, if possible, discover her attitude toward the work in which her father and he were engaged.
Norman of Torn could scarce repress a smile at this clever ruse of the old priest, and, assuming a similar attitude, he replied in French:

Full browser ?