Attitude Study

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Attitude Study

A survey conducted to measure the success of an advertising campaign or a client's satisfaction with a company. See also: Marketing.
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Reviewing the literature as a whole, Flack (1976) stated that attitude studies abounded, but research on the AB relation was scarce: "We have studies on attitudes, stereotypes, and links--but how these relate to action, public behavior, or the existence of influence within the national and international circumstances has not been adequately researched.
The advent of April as National Donate Life Month serves as the perfect backdrop for transplant organizations to release a plethora of data, progress reports, public attitude studies or as Donate Life America's calls it--the annual national report card on the progress of transplantation and organ donation in the US in 2009.
Finally, an examination of attitude studies of general education teachers also revealed that a lack of knowledge of disabling conditions affected the ability of these teachers to accept students with disabilities and differences (Cook, 2000).
Category research and usage and attitude studies reveal that consumers use refrigerated jarred fruit for snacks through the day and at every meal, says Sanderson, adding that the products are primarily purchased by adult female homemakers 35 years of age and older.
A review of wolf attitude studies conducted between 1972 and 2000 revealed that old age has consistently been associated with a negative attitude toward wolves for almost thirty years (Williams et al.
Social Distance scales have been widely used in attitude studies regarding disability (e.
Party identification is a useful analytic tool in voting behavior and political attitude studies.
A total of 390 business and non-business students at a large Southeastern university participated in the study-the population type used most often in ad attitude studies (Brown and Stayman, 1992).
Mirro conducts market research, national use and attitude studies to figure out who the bakeware consumer is and what matters to her when buying bakeware.
It should be noted that the term "instrumental" is applied here in a fashion similar to that used in many attitude studies (Elizur, 1970; Elizur and Guttman, 1976) which can be contrasted with the meaning applied in theories of work motivation (e.
Attitude studies conducted among hundreds of thousands of workers reveal this profile of today's employee:
According to one of the most comprehensive public attitude studies ever undertaken on organ donation, the public does not share the professionals' feelings on the issue.
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