NATO

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Related to Atlantic Alliance: North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NATO

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization. A military alliance originally designed to deter against potential Soviet invasion. Members pledge mutual defense; that is, an attack on one is considered an attack on all. Since the end of the Cold War, NATO has been involved in other military engagement, notably in the Balkans and Afghanistan. Members include the United States and a number of European countries. It was founded in 1949 and is based in Brussels.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Membership Action Plan in the alliance is the NATO program, designed for the consultations, rendering assistance and practical support in accordance with the individual needs of the countries wishing to join the North Atlantic Alliance.
Reyn argues persuasively that de Gaulle asked "too much for France" and then distanced himself from the Atlantic alliance when he could not realize his vision of it (p.
Musleh- The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), also called the North Atlantic Alliance , is an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty in which was signed on the 4th of April, 1949.
relations with the energy-rich Caspian Sea-Black Sea-Caucuses region; (4) security and development in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan; and (5) Europe and the continued vibrancy of the Atlantic Alliance.
His presence marks the latest step in efforts to build closer informal ties between the EU and the Atlantic alliance at a time when formal cooperation remains hampered by the Turkey-Cyprus dispute.
Rasmussen said he was deeply honored to be the first Dane to lead the Atlantic alliance and to have been named at the 60th anniversary summit.
The pacifists, responding to a call by Belgian groups Bombspotting and Vredeactie (Action for Peace), accuse the Atlantic alliance of being the instrument of US policy in Iraq and Afghanistan.
But there is no mistaking the mutual uneasiness between Moscow and the Atlantic Alliance.
The expansion of the North Atlantic alliance to twenty-six members including the three Baltic states marks the further advance of democracy and freedom throughout Europe.
There have been times when it was predicted by the all-knowing pundits that the Atlantic Alliance would crumble, that it would become irrelevant, that it was history.
Garton Ash takes an even sharper look at British pretensions to be a pivotal power, the hinge on which the future of the Atlantic alliance may turn.

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