Employment at Will

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Employment at Will

A form of employment in which either the employee or the employer may terminate employment with or without cause and with or without notice. For example, an employee may quit as soon as he/she finds a better job. Likewise, the employer may fire an employee even if he/she comes to work on time and performs diligently. Employment at will is not allowed in all jurisdictions and it is restricted even where it exists. For example, an employer ordinarily may not fire a worker on racial or religious grounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those policies often define the at-will employment expectations.
A doctor employed by the New York Times who refused to divulge employees' medical records without their consent does not meet a 1992 exception to the state's at-will employment doctrine and cannot sue for breach of contract after being fired, New York's highest court has ruled.
An employer can protect itself against an implied contract claim by requiring employees to sign a statement acknowledging at-will employment.
Mayfield filed a wrongful-discharge lawsuit under Texas law, arguing his retaliatory termination fell into an exception to the state's doctrine of at-will employment, but a state district judge dismissed the suit and an appellate panel upheld the ruling.
At-will employment is an employment relationship that allows either the employer or an employee to discontinue the employment relationship at any time, with or without reason.
Over the past few decades, however, the courts have contributed to the demise of the at-will employment doctrine through the crafting of a number of exceptions.
I also understand that [company name] may modify or rescind any of its policies, benefits, or practices described in the handbook, except the at-will employment policy and those policies required by law.
The circuit court focused on the language concerning an injury to "person or property," finding that no such injury occurred in Haddle because at-will employment does not create a constitutionally protected property interest.
Under the at-will employment doctrine, either the employer or the employee could end the employment relationship without notice and for any reason or even for no reason.
Courts continue to pick apart the precise working of handbook policies providing for at-will employment.
Montana's Supreme Court began to weaken the state's at-will employment doctrines in the mid-1970s.
Employees now have better job security through statutory protections and the judicial erosion of the at-will employment relationship.