Employment at Will

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Employment at Will

A form of employment in which either the employee or the employer may terminate employment with or without cause and with or without notice. For example, an employee may quit as soon as he/she finds a better job. Likewise, the employer may fire an employee even if he/she comes to work on time and performs diligently. Employment at will is not allowed in all jurisdictions and it is restricted even where it exists. For example, an employer ordinarily may not fire a worker on racial or religious grounds.
References in periodicals archive ?
that an employee's continued at-will employment wasn't enough consideration for an arbitration contract to be valid, as the employee still could be fired for any or no reason.
"These are at-will positions, and vetting as described above was conducted by the Governor's Appointments Office as permitted by law," said DeLeaver-Churchill.
Jeff Lapin knows about at-will employment, as he is in California.
It held that "an at-will employee, who has been terminated, can not state a fraudulent inducement claim on the basis of having relied upon the employer's promise not to terminate the contract, or upon any representations of future intentions as to the duration or security of his employment.
Other experts in the field were cautiously hopeful, noting though the pact was at-will, the desire for change during the Paris summit was greater than at any prior talks.
Depending on other courts' use of the decision in the future, Baker may have sweeping effects on all agreements--not merely arbitration agreements--between at-will employees and employers in the future.
The acknowledgment should also reiterate the at-will relationship, and that the handbook does not create a contract of employment.
Indiana is considered an "at-will" employment State meaning that an employer can terminate you for any reason and, therefore, doesn't even have to have a reason to let you go.
This text for law students begins with a historical overview and an explanation of the multi-layered nature of employment law, then examines common-law employment doctrines such as employment at-will, employment contracts and torts, workplace privacy issues, and restrictive covenants.
This Note will begin with an in-depth discussion of the at-will employment doctrine by tracing the history of its development.
New York has steadfastly adhered to the "at-will" employment doctrine--the idea that, absent a statutory or contractual restriction, the employment relationship is terminable at any time and for any reason by either employer or employee--for over one hundred years.
The new workers could enter the country under contract to a specific employer or under an at-will status that would allow them to work for several employers.