AU

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AU

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for AUSTRALIA.

AU

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Commonwealth of Australia. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Australian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Australia. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Australia. Each Australian state and territory has its own code with the prefix "AU." For example, the code for the New South Wales is ISO 3166-2:AU-NSW.
References in periodicals archive ?
html) formal definition of an astronomical unit , adopted by the IAU in 1976, was slightly less accessible to the layperson: "the radius of an unperturbed circular orbit a massless body would revolve about the sun in 2*(pi)/k days (i.
20 Astrophysical Journal, Luhman found no evidence for a Jupiter-mass planet within 82,000 astronomical units.
The researchers said that it could be found up to 30,000 astronomical units from the sun.
Both are separated by only 18 Astronomical Units (AU), similar to the distance between Uranus and our Sun.
4, 16, and 30 astronomical units (AU) from the star.
It also confirms that the planet is 12 to 15 Earth masses (about equal to Uranus) and orbits its star roughly 4 astronomical units out.
Gliese 710 also has a 1 in 10,000 probability of coming within 1000 astronomical units - 1 AU being the distance from the Earth to the sun.
The telescope will also be able to spot Jupiter-sized objects up to 60,000 astronomical units away.
77), but others calculated that the gravity of a passing star could have just as easily created the tilt, which lies about 70 astronomical units (AU) from the star.
The inner disk has larger grains, roughly 10 micrometers or larger in diameter, and extends out to four astronomical units, or AUs, beyond the star.
73 astronomical units (AU) from its star, where 1 AU is the distance between Earth and the sun.
Writing in the January 11th Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Andrew Shannon (University of Cambridge, UK) and colleagues used computer simulations to confirm that lots of rocky bodies originally within 2'A astronomical units of the Sun should now be lurking among the Oort Cloud's half trillion comets.