Assistive Technology

(redirected from Assistive device)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

Assistive Technology

A computer program or any other technology used to help physically impaired persons. One example of assistive technology is a computer program that reads newspapers aloud to blind persons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional training is held whenever a new technique or assistive device is added to the program.
The movement toward inclusive classrooms has facilitated development of less expensive and more versatile assistive devices.
The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of the hearing aid on listeners who were willing to "improve their hearing" with assistive devices.
To support the employment of persons with disabilities, the SWD launched the SPED in June 2013 to provide employers of persons with disabilities with a one-off subsidy for each employee with disabilities for procurement of assistive devices and/or workplace modifications.
Considerations including style, color, and accessories to the assistive device should always be decided by the consumer.
Assistive Devices Open New Frontier for Taiwan's Senior Care Industry
Visit to FSM to meet with key stakeholders including government, non-government entities, health service users to identify the current assistive device services provision system may involve the convening of stakeholder group meetings
An assistive device is any piece of equipment that assists a passenger with a disability to hear, see, communicate, maneuver, or perform other tractions of daily life, and may include medical devices and medications.
More akin to exercise equipment than an assistive device, many users say they have found they can increase the amount they walk, both for exercise and pleasure.
DOT's Aviation Consumer Protection Department also advises, "This does not mean a passenger can put a small assistive device into a carry-on or checked bag in an attempt at circumventing the normally applicable number limits for either type of item.
No matter what your level of disability, there is probably an assistive device that can help.
The opportunity for infants and young children to try out a particular technology before they, or funding agencies, make a financial investment in it is considerably important in view of the current practice of requiring full payment before an assistive device is ordered Pfrommer, 1984).
Full browser ?