Arpanet


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Arpanet

The first digital network that utilized packet switching, which is the transmission of data, regardless of content, in manageable chunks called packets. This was a revolutionary technology and ultimately led to the creation of the modern Internet. It was developed in the 1960s by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
References in periodicals archive ?
It performs functions analogous to the ARPANET's host-to-host protocol.
Como se menciono anteriormente la creacion de Arpanet surgio a raiz del interrogante planteado por el Departamento de Defensa de los Estados Unidos durante la guerra fria, respecto a ?como podrian las autoridades de los Estados Unidos comunicarse eficazmente despues de una guerra nuclear?
Graduate students designed ARPANET's protocols, often over pizza.
From ARPANET also spawned the short-lived satellite network (SATNET).
From the days of the Arpanet to today's Internet, it's e-business; there's no denying that this amalgam of microelectronic packages and pc boards has become instrumental to the way the industry does business.
Like ARPANet, which eventually evolved into the modern Internet, The Grid today is primarily the realm of academics, computer scientists, and the government.
The computer revolution began with government research projects like ARPANET, the benefits of which, coincidentally, began to trickle down to the private sector toward the start of Reagan's first term.
Yet its predecessor was originally formed in 1969 as a military network called Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPAnet) as part of the Department of Defense.
Brown's unqualified statement flies in the face of accepted wisdom, which suggests the first electronic communication between two computers took place between UCLA and the Stanford Research Institute in the United States over the Arpanet, some time in October 1969.
The first internet network linked just four computers at US Universities and was called ARPANET. Today, around 60 million computers are linked, used by 300 million users - five per cent of the world's population.
Created in 1969 as a partnership between the ivory towers of academe and the corridors of power at the Pentagon, the original purpose of the Internet carried a Cold War cachet: ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network), as it was christened, was to be a network for the exchange of defense-related information.