Second

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Related to Arc second: parsec, radian

Second

1. See: Second mortgage.

2. See: Second round.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, similar systems from Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Trimble Navigation Ltd., which supplies the transmitters to Arc Second, have been seen on construction sites for some time.
"DWFView is just one of the newest custom applications designed for PocketCAD PRO," said Michael Feilmeier, PocketCAD product manager at Arc Second. "Customers requiring access to a wide range of drawing formats will appreciate this enhanced capability."
I know because I backed Highland Reel, subsequently a King George winner and Arc second. Hartnell finished almost ten lengths behind Winx.
Accuracy specification is [+ or -]7.5 arc second with a [+ or -]2 arc second repeatability.
Instead of focusing most of the light from faint stars and galaxies into a tight circle with a radius of 0.1 arc second, the mirror spread the concentration of incoming rays.
It was not that Harbinger was an unlikely winner of the race, despite being nominally Sir Michael Stoute's number two behind record-breaking Derby winner Workforce in a field that also included recent Irish Derby hero Cape Blanco and three-time Arc second Youmzain.
This site is blessed with remarkably good seeing, and the telescope can resolve images 0.5 arc second across.
* A direct-coupled, high-accuracy rotary encoder that achieves resolution of <0.03 arc second and accuracy of [+ or -]1 arc second or less.
The C-axis accuracy is 15 arc seconds with a [+ or -]5 arc second repeatability.
For 3- to 5-axis machining centers, Hamar's L-743 Ultra-Precision Triple Scan laser has three rotating laser planes that are perpendicular to 1 arc second and flat to 1/2 arc second in a 360 degree sweep and 1/4 arc second in a 90 degree sweep.
International news on racingpost.com VVJAPAN Arc second Orfevre starts season with an odds-on victory
Astronomy and astrophysics: Among the telescopes envisioned for the sky-watchers of tomorrow is a group of orbiting radiotelescopes, linked by laser beams into interferometers with baselines up to 100 times the diameter of the earth and capable of resolving sources as narrow as 10 one-millionths of an arc second. Optical and infrared observations might be conducted in space with a cluster of nine telescopes mounted on a tetrahedral array of struts, each loner than a football field.